LINGUIST List 2.583

Sat 28 Sep 1991

Disc: Semantics and Chinese Kreplach

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. David E Newton, Semantics
  2. Michel Eytan LILoL, Re: 2.563 Queries
  3. Geoffrey Russom, Re: 2.570 Queries

Message 1: Semantics

Date: Thu, 26 Sep 91 14:30 BST
From: David E Newton <DEN1vaxb.york.ac.uk>
Subject: Semantics
Any subscribers with a leaning towards sementics may be interested in
the following sign, which I spotted in the window of my local homebrew
shop here in York:
		---------------------------------
		 CUT THE COST OF CHRISTMAS
			Brew your own !!
		---------------------------------
I think we all know what they meant, but it could have come straight out
of a semantics coursebook!
David E Newton
den1uk.ac.york.vaxa
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Message 2: Re: 2.563 Queries

Date: Sat, 28 Sep 91 14:30:35 +0100
From: Michel Eytan LILoL <mesuzuka.u-strasbg.fr>
Subject: Re: 2.563 Queries
I have saved a few of the messages (more precisely 7 mailings) concerning
 Compositional Semantics, but since I am new to the list there might have been
 many more. Anyone interested please contact me directly.
As for Bruce Nevin's query: Emmanuel is the English rendering of the Hebrew
 Immanuel which means "God with us".
Michel Eytan, LILoL
Univ. Strasbourg II
eytansuzuka.u-strasbg.fr
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Message 3: Re: 2.570 Queries

Date: Fri, 27 Sep 91 14:26:35 EDT
From: Geoffrey Russom <EL403015brownvm.brown.edu>
Subject: Re: 2.570 Queries
Here's one to add to "Chinese kreplach": In heavily Italian-American
Providence, Rhode Island, the fried dumplings served at "Little
Chopsticks" and other Chinese restaurants appear on the menu
as "Peking Ravioli" -- sort of Marco Polo in reverse. The
designation has become so standard around here that I have no
idea what these appetizers are called in (tranliterated) Chinese.
Local Canadian French influence on culinary terms is also evident: even
Italian-Americans call chicken cacciatore "chicken chaser (<chasseur)".
It would be "chicken catcher" if you went directly from Italian.
 -- Rick Russom
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