LINGUIST List 2.591

Sun 29 Sep 1991

Misc: Errors, Einstein, Turkic, IPA

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. Ron Kuzar, Re: 2.563 Queries
  2. Graeme Hirst, Re: 2.584 Request for Info; Corpora of errors
  3. , 2.588 Einstein
  4. AHARRIS - Alan Harris, Emmanuel, ASL, Turkic
  5. Michel Eytan LILoL, Re: Fonts and IPA
  6. , left and right, alienable and inalienable

Message 1: Re: 2.563 Queries

Date: Sat, 28 Sep 1991 19:12 IST
From: Ron Kuzar <SOUKR%HUJIVM1TAUNIVM.TAU.AC.IL>
Subject: Re: 2.563 Queries
With regard to Emmanuel:
'emmanu' - or as I would transliterate it - 'immanu' means in Hebrew
'with us'. It is a theophoric name meaning 'God is with us' or
as a wish 'may God be with us'. 'emmanu' is the way it was spelled
in the Septuagint, and is the standard non-Hebrew form.
Ron Kuzar Jerusalem
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Message 2: Re: 2.584 Request for Info; Corpora of errors

Date: Sun, 29 Sep 1991 11:57:09 -0400
From: Graeme Hirst <ghcs.toronto.edu>
Subject: Re: 2.584 Request for Info; Corpora of errors
> Does anybody know where I can find corpora of errors done by learners ?
> This research concerns mainly the acquisition of French, but English corpora
> will be ok.
It's not exactly a corpus, but you might find the following book useful:
M Swan & B Smith (eds). //Learner English: A teacher's guide to
 interference and other problems//. Cambridge University Press, 1987.
\\\\ Graeme Hirst University of Toronto	Computer Science Department
//// ghcs.utoronto.ca / ghcs.toronto.edu / 416-978-8747
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Message 3: 2.588 Einstein

Date: Sun, 29 Sep 91 16:32:15 -0400
From: <valisAthena.MIT.EDU>
Subject: 2.588 Einstein
> Date: Sat, 28 Sep 91 12:28:54 -0500
> From: "Michael Kac" <kaccs.umn.edu>
> Subject: Re: 2.567 Einstein
>
> Ralf Thiede alludes to Einstein's having come up with the principle of
> relativity. That's false: the principle had been in physics for a long
> time (was due, I think, to Newton in fact).
In introductory physics textbooks, classical (i.e. non-relativistic)
transformations of coordinates are known as ``Galilean.'' This would
seem to make Galileo the culprit. I'm pretty sure you'll find it in
some form at the beginning of the Third Day of the _Two_New_Sciences_.
John O'Neil
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Message 4: Emmanuel, ASL, Turkic

Date: Sun, 29 Sep 1991 14:49:24 EDT
From: AHARRIS - Alan Harris <vcspc005VAX.CSUN.EDU>
Subject: Emmanuel, ASL, Turkic
TO: Bruce Nevin: "Emmanuel" derives from ?imanu el, with-us God
TO: Maggi Sokolnik: is ASL a second or foreign language and is it therefore
suitable for lanuaguage requirements? this Q wqas fought out on our campus ten
years ago--nice to know that we ahead of BU and that they have asses for
administrators, too. Your friend at BU could write to the Director, National C
enter on Deafness, CSU, Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 or the Coordinator,
Linguistics Interdisciplinary Program, Professor Francine Hallcom to get
documentation that, indeed, we know that ASL is not just a variant of AmEng.
TO: John Phillips: Turkic
Speakers of Turkic (not Turkish) in Central Asia view themselves
ethnocentrically and therefore separately; I guess that you could make a
pretty strong case for dialect or very near cognate for Turkish and Azeri, but
I doubt that you could say anything more than cognate for Uzbek-Turkish.
Bashkir, Khirgiz, and Uzbek are quite close, but Uighur is much further away;
Kazakh can often be figured out by Turkish and Azeri speakers and U9ighur
speakers usually can get more eastern dialect of Kazakh. I am working with an
Uighur woman and she swears that she can understand no more than fifty percent
of West Turkic (Turkish et al.); the Turks who know her say the same thing in
reverse. HOWEVER, they are alkl pretty much separate cases of ethnos. cf. the
newspapers regarding the activity of the separate republics. Oh, and yes,
these divisions have existed for a long time, since Tamerlane (Timurlang) and
before. . . hope that doesn't confuse you more!
 Alan Harris, Speech communication, CSUN, SPCH, Northridge, CA.91330
aharrisvax.csun.bitnet
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Message 5: Re: Fonts and IPA

Date: Sat, 28 Sep 91 16:19:06 +0100
From: Michel Eytan LILoL <mesuzuka.u-strasbg.fr>
Subject: Re: Fonts and IPA
sorry to reply belatedly, apparently the gates between Bitnet and Internet are
 somewhat erratic (I get the mail in reverse order, some messages seem missing,
 ...); and besides I hesitated to reply, some of the assertions about Macs being
 hard to palate (sorry about the syntax). Nevertheless, I want to come in this
 message to the defense of the PCs: there exist many phonetic phonts out there.
In particular you can ftp to aisun.ai.uga.ed, where you will find a directory
 ai.phonetic fonts with a Contents file whose (or that's?) contents I give below
===============================================================================
Contents of ai.phonetic.fonts
This directory contains a set of Laserjet II fonts and
Word Perfect printer drivers for typesetting phonetics,
Greek, and Cyrillic, as well as the ordinary English alphabet.
They are distributed free of charge by Timothy Montler of
the University of North Texas. Download the "readme" file
for further information. Contact the author directly
if you have questions.
Files:
readme -- Detailed instructions for installing the fonts. Text file.
fonts.exe -- IBM PC program which, when executed, unpacks itself into
 a set of files containing the fonts. Use binary FTP.
drivers.exe -- IBM PC program which, when executed, unpacks itself into
 a set of files containing Word Perfect drivers and
 Hercules Ramfont graphics data. Use binary FTP.
===============================================================================
If you have no ftp on your machine, send me a meaage and I will e-mail to you
 the files.
michel
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Message 6: left and right, alienable and inalienable

Date: Sun, 29 Sep 91 13:49:50 EDT
From: <Alexis_Manaster_Ramermts.cc.wayne.edu>
Subject: left and right, alienable and inalienable
Since I am always suspicious of superficial implicational universals,
I welcome the information from George Broadwell that languages with
a strong system of alienable/inalienable need not have a cardinal-
point-based deictic system. I would add that many a Uto-Aztecan
language (e.g., Tubatulabal) works the same as Choctaw.
Going in the other direction, Malagasy would appear to be a
counterexample: it relies on cardinal points for deixis, yet
does not seem to have a strong sense of inalienable possession.
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