LINGUIST List 2.681

Fri 18 Oct 1991

Misc: Clitics, 'Come' and 'bring', R-insertion, Potawatomi

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Directory

  1. "Judith Klavans", 2.668 Queries
  2. Henry "S." Thompson, Re: 2.668 Queries
  3. Ellen Prince, Query: `Come' and `bring'.
  4. Ellen Prince, Re: 2.668 Queries
  5. John O'Meara, Potawatomi

Message 1: 2.668 Queries

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 91 10:35:28 EDT
From: "Judith Klavans" <klavanswatson.ibm.com>
Subject: 2.668 Queries
Ref: Your note of Thu, 17 Oct 1991 00:27:30 -0500
For an article on clitics in Lexical Functional Grammar,
see "Configuration in Non-Configurational Languages", in
the West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, 1982, pp. 292-306.
Clitic behavior from the Australian language Ngiyambaa is used
to illustrate the power of LFG functional structure in the analysis
of "non-configurational languages", and as a motivation
for the basic PS rule S --> alpha (Enclitic) alpha-KleeneStar.
I am the author of that paper.
For an article on clitics in Spanish handled by a two-level
morphological analyzer, see Tzoukermann, Evelyne and
Mark Liberman's paper from COLING, 1990.
Judith Klavans
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Message 2: Re: 2.668 Queries

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 91 09:42:56 BST
From: Henry "S." Thompson <htcogsci.edinburgh.ac.uk>
Subject: Re: 2.668 Queries
Re Jim McCawley
Jim is a native speaker of galus Glaswegian, where one of the filled
pause markers is indeed [ai], homophonous with "aye", which is to say
"yes", a not uncommon situation. There is no problem vis a vis the
1st person singular nominative pronoun, as that is pronounced [^],
that is, wedge, more or less.
ht
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Message 3: Query: `Come' and `bring'.

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 91 08:12:18 -0400
From: Ellen Prince <ellencentral.cis.upenn.edu>
Subject: Query: `Come' and `bring'.
>Date: Tue, 15 Oct 91 17:53:32 +0100
>From: Adam Kilgarriff <adamkcogs.sussex.ac.uk>
>Subject: Query: `Come' and `bring'.
>
>
>I once heard a reference to some research which compared the phrasal
>constructions and idioms involving `come' and `bring', and concluded that the
>patterns were very similar for the two verbs. Does this produce any flicker of
>recognition? If so, could you give me any further clues which might help me
>locate the work.
i recall a paper of fillmore's, but don't have the reference.
there's also some relevant stuff in:
Kuno, S. 1976. Subject, theme, and the speaker's empathy--a reexamination
 of relativization phenomena. In Li, C., ed. Subject and topic. NY:
 Academic Press. Pp. 417-44.
Kuno, S. and Kaburaki, E. 1977. Empathy and syntax. LI8.627-72.
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Message 4: Re: 2.668 Queries

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 91 08:08:45 -0400
From: Ellen Prince <ellencentral.cis.upenn.edu>
Subject: Re: 2.668 Queries
>This rule made me wonder about the position of the /u:/, as in 'groom'.
>To my humble non-native ears, r-insertion after /u:/ appears to be
>possible, even though it is a close vowel, as in 'you and me' /ju:rnmi:/
>and 'hue and cry' /hju:rnkraI/. Am I right in assuming this? If so, can
>we perhaps posit a rule preceding r-insertion that diphthongizes the /u:/ to
>/U/, so that Wells' rule still holds (since it does include centring
>diphthongs)?
>
>Does anyone know how common intrusive r-insertion is in RP? Is it the
>predominant phenomenon in environments defined by the rule or not?
i'm not a phonologist and i'm not sure what rp is, but in my r-linking dialect
of new york city english, there is no possibility of r-insertion after /u:/ in
groom, hue and cry, etc.
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Message 5: Potawatomi

Date: Fri, 18 Oct 91 08:59:07 EDT
From: John O'Meara <jomearaTHUNDER.LAKEHEADU.CA>
Subject: Potawatomi
re request for Potawatomi lexical information, try John Nichols (Native
Studies, 532 Fletcher Argue Building, University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2; no e-mail address that I know of). He did
fieldwork on Potawatomi in the 1970s and should be able to help.
John O'Meara
Lakehead University
Thunder Bay, Ontario
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