LINGUIST List 2.684

Sun 20 Oct 1991

Disc: (S)he Goes Like

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Directory

  1. , I'm like...
  2. Ricky Jacobs, Re: 2.672 (S)he goes
  3. , Re: 2.672 (S)he goes
  4. Fran Karttunen, all____

Message 1: I'm like...

Date: Fri, 18 Oct 91 12:05:00 EDT
From: <Margaret.Luebsub.cc.umich.edu>
Subject: I'm like...
In regard to the current discussion -- there's an article in American
Speech (1990, vol 65 no 3 pp 213-227) by Carl Blyth, Jr., Sigrid
Recktenwald & Jenny Wang, "I'm like, "say what?!": a new quotative
in American oral narrative" with some interesting points. The authors
don't find anyone over 32 using "be like" as a quotative, and I would
definitely question that -- I know a number of 40-year-olds (in
California) who use it. They don't mention any occurrence of "be all"
as a quotative, but I've certainly heard it -- is it very new?
very rare? very casual? And what about "they were all like....."??
-- Margaret Luebs, University of Michigan
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Message 2: Re: 2.672 (S)he goes

Date: Fri, 18 Oct 91 13:07:21 -1000
From: Ricky Jacobs <rjacobsuhccux.uhcc.Hawaii.Edu>
Subject: Re: 2.672 (S)he goes
Here in Hawai'i I hear many teenagers using something that sounds like "I'm all"
 and "(s)he's all to introduce a direct quotation "(s)he's all". I haven't been
 able to get it in second person or plural forms.
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Message 3: Re: 2.672 (S)he goes

Date: Sat, 19 Oct 91 15:31:15 EST
From: <>
Subject: Re: 2.672 (S)he goes
 Fantome de l'Opera' de Gaston Leroux <ECMILLERucs.indiana.edu>
>Date: Thu, 17 Oct 91 10:06 EST
>From: Erik Carvalhal Miller <ECMILLERIUBACS.BITNET>
>Subject: like, 'round and 'round she goes
>>I've done a little data collection and analysis of "I'm like," and "He's
>>like." I think it's different from "go" in that "go" is really a verb of
>>quotation, whereas "like" involves at best paraphrase, and in the case
>>of "I'm like" can simply reveal the person's thoughts rather than words
>>(these observations are of people 18-30 -- "like" may have evolved further
>>in the younger generation). So you get sentences like (1)
>>
>>(1) I'm like "Give me a break."
>
>I'm twenty-one years old, and the above observations fit my intuitions exactly.
Later, the very same day I sent out this message, I went to my part-time job at
a university cafeteria. A cart I wheeled out of the dishwashing room was
especially chock-full of clean plates, and I was a little frustrated as I kept
putting tens and tens of plates away, so I said:
 It's like, these dishes are comin' out of nowhere!
I immediately realized my submission to LINGUIST was incomplete; "be like" as a
verb characterizing a situation can take an impersonal object as well.
 It was like, nobody wanted to volunteer his time. [or "their time"]
 It's like, I'm totally confused.
 It was like, he had no idea what was goin' on.
It's like, I'm outahere.
Erik Carvalhal Miller
ECMILLERIUBACS.INDIANA.EDU
Indiana University (Bloomington)
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Message 4: all____

Date: Sat, 19 Oct 1991 10:44:48 GMT-10:00
From: Fran Karttunen <kartunenuhccux.uhcc.Hawaii.Edu>
Subject: all____
It seems to me that there might be a potential evolution of the use of
copula + "all" as illustrated in these sentences:
She's all wet.
She's all upset.
She's all shivering and sobbing.
She's all "boo hoo hoo."
She's all "<quote>"
What I haven't (yet) heard is "like" or "all" with no vestige of the copula,
but maybe it's out there.
Fran Karttunen
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