LINGUIST List 2.692

Tue 22 Oct 1991

Misc: Phonology, Pauses, R-linking

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Directory

  1. Richard Ogden, RE: 2.674 Phonological Issues
  2. , Filled pauses
  3. Monica Macaulay, filled pauses
  4. , Re: 2.675 Pauses
  5. Geoffrey Russom, Re: 2.681 R-linking

Message 1: RE: 2.674 Phonological Issues

Date: Fri, 18 Oct 91 9:36 BST
From: Richard Ogden <RAO1vaxb.york.ac.uk>
Subject: RE: 2.674 Phonological Issues
Jim Scobbie points out that one way to deal with 'intrusive stops'
is by 'altering the timing and overlap of the exponents of the features
in question' and that 'this is to claim that there are sophisticated,
systematic, non-univeral rules of phonetic implementation. Is this
contraversial?'
I don't know if it is or not; but I think it is right. Why else do
different languages just sound different? French doesn't sound like
English in any way, nor does German, or any other language. Why? because
the 'low level' phonetics is just different. What then does it mean
to say that certain phonological features are 'the same' when their
interpretation in different languages is different? or when the features
they stand in relation to in different languages is different? If
phonetic interpretation rules are non-universal (as I believe), to what
extent can phonological features said to be universal? -- and if each
language has a different interpretation of 'the same' feature, what are
the constraints on what might constitute an interpretation of that
feature so that you recognise it as 'the same'?
Richard Ogden
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Message 2: Filled pauses

Date: Fri, 18 Oct 1991 09:37:18 +0100
From: <kjetilrhhedda.uio.no>
Subject: Filled pauses
Bulgarian has a well-developed system of pause fillers:
_tova_ (proximal demonstrative, neuter) for definite NP's,
_takova_ (demonstrative adjective/pronoun,neuter, "such") for indefinite
NP's, and
_takovam_ (conjugated as a verb of the a-class) for verbs.
Let me also point out a definite advantage that similar pause-fillers have
over _um_, _e:_ and the like: you can actually go on speaking, even if you
have forgotten much of what you were going to say.
-Kjetil Ra Hauge, U. of Oslo, P.O. Box 1030 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo 3, Norway
-E-mail: kjetilrhhedda.uio.no -Fax: +472-454310 -Phone: +472-456710
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Message 3: filled pauses

Date: Fri, 18 Oct 91 00:00:30 -0500
From: Monica Macaulay <macaulayj.cc.purdue.edu>
Subject: filled pauses
Add to our list: in Spanish (Mexican, anyway) I've heard
"este" ('this') used to hold the floor... Mixtec speakers
(bilingual in Mixtec & Spanish) use it while speaking Mixtec,
too.
Monica
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Message 4: Re: 2.675 Pauses

Date: Fri, 18 Oct 1991 08:44 CST
From: <LIFY460orange.cc.utexas.edu>
Subject: Re: 2.675 Pauses
Lee Hartman's contribution about final _um_ reminded me of something
I noticed 20 years ago in Zurich, namely final _oder_ 'or'. My
impression at the time was that it was an open-minded invitation for
discourse participants to present an alternative viewpoint.
Christine Kamprath
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Message 5: Re: 2.681 R-linking

Date: Sat, 19 Oct 91 11:06:36 EDT
From: Geoffrey Russom <EL403015brownvm.brown.edu>
Subject: Re: 2.681 R-linking
My understanding is that you get r-linking primarily to avoid a hiatus
between vowels. With tense "u," there's an off-glide "w" to avoid the
hiatus, so it's not surprising to find that Ellen doesn't get r-linking
in that environment. Linking "-r" is also sometimes present word-finally
before a pause (my British grandmother said "akapulker" for
"Acapulco" even at the end of a sentence). But a word-final "-r" after
tense "u" amounts to a final consonant cluster [wr], which is so awkward
for English speakers that epenthesis or vowel shortening would be used to
correct it.
-- Rick
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