LINGUIST List 2.734

Thu 31 Oct 1991

Jobs: Syntax, Discourse Analysis, Post-doc

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  1. BARBARA PARTEE, Job
  2. , JOB at U Texas - Arlington
  3. Jacob Hoeksema, jobs

Message 1: Job

Date: Wed, 30 Oct 91 17:05 EST
From: BARBARA PARTEE <PARTEEcs.umass.EDU>
Subject: Job
			POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT
 The Department of Linguistics at the University of Massachusetts
 at Amherst invites applications for a possible one-year Visiting
 Assistant or Associate Professor position, contingent on funding,
 to begin September 1, 1992. Specialization: syntax. Salary
 commensurate with qualifications. Send letter of application,
 curriculum vitae, sample publications, and three letters of
 reference by Feb. 14, 1992 to:
 Syntax Search Committee
 Department of Linguistics
 South College
 University of Massachusetts
 Amherst, MA 01003
 The University of Massachusetts at Amherst is an Equal
 Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
				PLEASE POST
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Message 2: JOB at U Texas - Arlington

Date: Thu, 31 Oct 91 08:56:56 CST
From: <huttar%dallasutafll.uta.edu>
Subject: JOB at U Texas - Arlington
 The University of Texas at Arlington, Program in Linguistics
 announces one tenure track opening at the Assistant/Associate Professor
 level beginning September 1992 in Text Theory, Text Linguistics, and
 Discourse Analysis. Publications and grants record required.
 Candidates should have a record of linguistic fieldwork and have a
 non-IE language area specialty. The University of Texas at Arlington
 is connected with the Summer Institute of Linguistics, Dallas, TX and
 has a graduate linguistics program at the MA and PhD levels with
 special emphasis in field linguistics. The candidate would have
 responsibility for teaching the text theory portion of our BA and MA
 linguistics program and in the PhD program in Graduate Humanities.
 The candidate would also be expected to supervise theses and
 dissertations. Salary and rank commensurate with experience. UTA is
 an Equal Opportunity Employer. Deadline for CV's and names and
 addresses of persons to provide supporting letters, Feb. 1, 1992.
 Address: Dr. J. Edmondson
 	 Linguistics
 	 University of Texas at Arlington
 	 Arlington, TX 76019
 	 USA
 E-mail: jerryutafll.uta.edu
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Message 3: jobs

Date: Thu, 31 Oct 91 13:00:30 MET
From: Jacob Hoeksema <hoeksemalet.rug.nl>
Subject: jobs
Opening 1:
The University of Groningen (the Netherlands) has an opening
for a
POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW
with (1) experience in the field of computational linguistics,
especially natural-language parsing, and (2) a solid
background in logic and (3) some interest in corpus-oriented
research.
The succesful candidate will take part in a 5-year project
(called 'Reflections of Logical Patterns in Language Structure
and Language Use') at the University of Groningen sponsored by
the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research as part of
their Pionier program. The project focusses on the study of
logico-semantic patterns (in particular those associated with
negation and quantification) in natural language from a wide
variety of perspectives, including in particular
psycholinguistic, computational and diachronic points of view.
The task of the candidate is to design and develop parsing
modules and tools which enable automatic detection of
monotonicity and other logical properties of words and
expressions in a given linguistic context. For example, this
includes the formulation of algorithms which determine whether
a given expression can be replaced in a given sentence by more
or less specific items while preserving the truth of that
sentence. Similarly for the applicability of the De Morgan
laws and other related boolean properties.
The position is a temporary one, with a maximum length of five
years.
Send applications and all inquiries to dr. Jack Hoeksema,
Faculty of Letters, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 716,
9700 AS Groningen, The Netherlands.
E-mail: hoeksemalet.rug.nl
Deadline: December 16, 1991
Opening 2.
The University of Groningen (the Netherlands) has an opening
for a
POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW
with experience in the field of psycholinguistics. Required
are a solid knowledge of theories of language acquisition and
an interest in semantics (preferably one which can be traced
in publications).
The succesful candidate will take part in a 5-year project
(called 'Reflections of Logical Patterns in Language Structure
and Language Use') at the University of Groningen sponsored by
the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research as part of
their Pionier program. The project focusses on the study of
logico-semantic patterns (in particular those associated with
negation and quantification) in natural language from a wide
variety of perspectives, including in particular psycho-
linguistic, computational and diachronic points of view. The
task of the candidate is to study the acquisition and use of
semantically-defined dependencies in natural language, such as
those between positive and negative polarity items and their
respective triggers and anti-triggers, in connection with a
study of the acquisition and use of logical operators such as
negation, implication and the comparative. One of the
questions involved is the extent to which the acquisition of
polarity items is mirrored or preceded by the acquisition and
correct use of their triggers. Other questions involve the
precise path along which polarity-sensitivity is mastered, how
various classes of polarity-sensitive items are established by
the child, in which environments these items first show up, to
what extent overgeneration is found, the role of negative
evidence in the acquisition process and so on.
The position is a temporary one, with a maximum length of five
years.
Send applications (with CV) and all inquiries to dr. Jack
Hoeksema, Faculty of Letters, University of Groningen, P.O.
Box 716, 9700 AS Groningen, The Netherlands.
E-mail: hoeksemalet.rug.nl
Deadline: December 16, 1991
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