LINGUIST List 2.820

Sat 23 Nov 1991

Qs: Helium, grammar checkers, Slavic Muslims, Legends, Word

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. BROADWELL GEORGE AARON, helium
  2. , Experiences with grammar checkers
  3. Dan I. Slobin, Slavic Muslims in Yugoslavia
  4. "don l. f. nilsen", contemporary legends
  5. Larry Horn, Word for the Mac

Message 1: helium

Date: Thu, 21 Nov 91 10:53:04 -0500
From: BROADWELL GEORGE AARON <gb661csc.albany.edu>
Subject: helium
In my lecture on phonetics yesterday, a student asked me why
inhaling helium makes your voice go up.
I was totally stumped.
Can anyone out there explain this to me?
******************************************************************************
Aaron Broadwell, Dept. of Linguistics, University at Albany -- SUNY,
Albany, NY 12222 gb661leah.albany.edu
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: Experiences with grammar checkers

Date: Thu, 21 Nov 91 16:50 GMT
From: <Arie.Verhagenlet.ruu.nl>
Subject: Experiences with grammar checkers
One of the questions I asked in my earlier query about grammar and
style checkers was whether anybody knew publications about the way
users worked with them and evaluated them. As it turned out, I
received several answers to my other questions, but not to this one.
I was reminded of this striking fact when reading the recent anecdotes
about some people's personal experiences. I still wonder: Is it really
the case that nobody has done any research on this topic and published
it?
--Arie Verhagen
<verhagenlet.ruu.nl>
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 3: Slavic Muslims in Yugoslavia

Date: Thu, 21 Nov 91 23:35:38 -0800
From: Dan I. Slobin <slobincogsci.Berkeley.EDU>
Subject: Slavic Muslims in Yugoslavia
Serbs and Croats:
The press speaks of three ethnic groups in Bosnia/Herzegovina:
Serbs, Croats, and "Slavic Muslims." But, surely, the third
group must speak something like either "Serbian" or "Croatian"--
or is there no real language difference, but only a religious
split between Orthodox, Catholic, and Muslim? What variety of
Serbo-Croatian do the Muslims speak, and in which alphabet do
they prefer to write?
-Dan Slobin (slobincogsci.berkeley.edu)
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 4: contemporary legends

Date: Thu, 21 Nov 91 07:53:18 MST
From: "don l. f. nilsen" <ATDFNASUACAD.bitnet>
Subject: contemporary legends
 Is anyone out there interested in discussing the CONTEMPORARY
or URBAN LEGEND, and/or related genres like THE TALL TALE, the LEGEND, the
GOTHIC NOVEL, etc. I'm especially looking for Archetypes, Prototypes,
and Stereotypes as they relate to these traditions.
=-) ;-> 8*) {^_^}
Don L. F. Nilsen
<ATDFNASUACAD.BITNET>, (602) 965-7592
Executive Secretary
International Society for Humor Studies
English Department
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ 85287-0302
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 5: Word for the Mac

Date: Fri, 22 Nov 91 12:10:07 EDT
From: Larry Horn <LHORNYALEVM.YCC.Yale.Edu>
Subject: Word for the Mac
A discovery and a query (sorry if I'm not the first on this):
 I just brought home my new Mac bundle, complete with an official,
unpirated version of MS Word 4, with its full documentation. This
documentation includes a hefty (450 page) reference guide to the word
processing program featuring, as usual, a number of example documents to
illustrate how to perform various functions in Word. Imagine my surprise when
I found, among the standard items (School Auction, Zoo Inventory, Form Letter
for a mail order food company offering pesto sauce, country pate's, and
chocolate macadamias--very upscale, these Word users), a thesis on (or at
least covering) the rise of periphrastic "do". No author is named, of course,
but it looks real, and the short excerpt appearing on the screen cites
Traugott and Visser. (See p. 394 of "Reference to Microsoft Word", if you have
a copy, for the clearest illustration, but it pops up elsewhere as well.) A
couple of questions arise: Does this mean that (the Microsoft people think)
linguists are especially likely to use Macintoshes (and Word) for their
academic computing? Does it mean that a relative of the MS Word technical
staff is working on historical English syntax? Does the writer of the
(putative) thesis know his or her work is borrowed without acknowledgment?
And--just in case the question arises in the linguistics category of the new
edition of Trivial Pursuit--who IS the writer, anyway?
 Larry Horn
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue