LINGUIST List 2.846

Fri 06 Dec 1991

Qs: Ling. Dictionary, Texas Ling. Forum, Reduplication

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  1. , QUERIE: Linguistics Dictionary
  2. Michael Covington, Texas Ling. Forum
  3. Michael Covington, Reduplication
  4. , NOT? Yes Way!

Message 1: QUERIE: Linguistics Dictionary

Date: Wed, 4 Dec 91 15:53:18 EST
From: <Kelly.K.Wahlub.cc.umich.edu>
Subject: QUERIE: Linguistics Dictionary
Does anyone out there know of a good, current dictionary of Linguistic
Terminology? I have in mind particularly a mono-lingual English dictionary,
but would also be interested in any info on dictionaries (mono- or bi-lingual)
of linguistic terms in German, French, and Russian.
Thanks. (Kelly_Wahlub.cc.umich.edu)
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Message 2: Texas Ling. Forum

Date: Wed, 04 Dec 91 17:50:41 EST
From: Michael Covington <MCOVINGTuga.cc.uga.edu>
Subject: Texas Ling. Forum
Where, if anywhere, can I find the issue of Texas Linguistic Forum
(vol. 22, 1983 I think) containing Karttunen's and others' papers on
two-level morphological processing?
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Message 3: Reduplication

Date: Wed, 04 Dec 91 17:49:45 EST
From: Michael Covington <MCOVINGTuga.cc.uga.edu>
Subject: Reduplication
Does reduplication always occur at the beginning of the stem?
I.e., from a stem ABC, you can get AABC, ABABC, or ABCABC, but
is there any language in which you could get ABCC or ABCBC?
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Message 4: NOT? Yes Way!

Date: Wed, 4 Dec 91 18:40:53 EST
From: <ingriaBBN.COM>
Subject: NOT? Yes Way!
Speaking of ... NOT!, does anybody have anything to say about the
origins of ``Yes way''? As far as I know, this is used only as a
reply to ``No way'':
Your music is going to revolutionize the world.
No way!
Yes way.
This shows up in _Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure_, uttered by
George Carlin, in a context not unlike the example. I've also heard
it attributed to ``hoodsie'' speak in the Massachussetts area.
(``Hoodsie'' is a slighting term that refers to young women from the
suburbs, you know, the 'hoods.)
Hoping for the straight poop...
-30-
Bob
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