* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *
LINGUIST List 20.228

Sat Jan 24 2009

Diss: Applied Ling: Ramezanpour: 'A Study of Repair Moves by ...'

Editor for this issue: Evelyn Richter <evelynlinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.
Directory
        1.    parisa Ramezanpour, A Study of Repair Moves by Persian Learners of English in Text Chat and Voice Chat Interactive in English


Message 1: A Study of Repair Moves by Persian Learners of English in Text Chat and Voice Chat Interactive in English
Date: 23-Jan-2009
From: parisa Ramezanpour <papary1979yahoo.com>
Subject: A Study of Repair Moves by Persian Learners of English in Text Chat and Voice Chat Interactive in English
E-mail this message to a friend

Institution: Australian National University
Program: Department of Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2009

Author: Parisa Ramezanpour

Dissertation Title: A Study of Repair Moves by Persian Learners of English in Text Chat and Voice Chat Interactive in English

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics

Subject Language(s): English (eng)

Dissertation Director:
Saeed Ketabi
Mahmoud Mehrabi

Dissertation Abstract:

This study explored the patterns of repair moves in synchronous non-native
speaker (NNS) text chat rooms in comparison to voice chat rooms on the
Internet. The study examined qualities that naturally and uniquely occurred
in the anonymous, synchronous chat room environment, the focus on written
and spoken language devoid of the gestures, expressions, and additional
tools inherent to other environments, for example. In this study, there are
two kinds of main repair moves: negotiation of meaning and negative
feedback. 1) Negotiation of meaning is divided into four categories: a)
Clarification requests, b) Confirmation checks, c) Self-Repetition and d)
Comprehension checks. Negative feedback is divided into five categories: a)
Recasts, b) Explicit correction, c) Questions, d) Incorporations and e)
Self-corrections. The following questions were posed: a) Which types of
repair moves occur in text and voice chats by Persian learners of English?
b) What are the differences between the repair moves in text chats and
voice chats when time is held constant? c) Are repair moves in voice chat
higher than in text chat? d) Does pronunciation repair affect repair moves
in voice chat? In addition, the data were then analyzed from five different
angles, in five steps: Step 1: significant differences in repair moves
produced in text versus voice chat. Step 2a: significant differences of NOM
repair moves produced in text versus voice chat. Step 2b: significant
differences of NF repair moves produced in text versus voice chat. Step 3:
significant differences of NOM repair moves versus NF repair moves produced
in combined chats. Step 4: significant differences of clarification
requests versus other types of NOM repair moves produced in combined chats.

The participants in this study were 60 adult speakers of Farsi who were
undergraduate majors of English at Isfahan University. The data were
collected in the café nets of Isfahan University. Repair moves made by
anonymous NNSs in 10, 5-minute, synchronous chat room sessions (5 text-chat
sessions, 5 voice-chat sessions) were counted and analyzed using chi-square
with alpha set at .05. Significant differences were found between the
higher number of total repair moves made in voice chats and the smaller
number in text chats. Qualitative data analysis showed that repair work in
voice chats was often pronunciation-related. The study includes discussion
that may affect teachers' and learners' considerations of the value of NNS
chat room interaction for second language development.



Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue




Please report any bad links or misclassified data

LINGUIST Homepage | Read LINGUIST | Contact us

NSF Logo

While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed
on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.