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LINGUIST List 20.2471

Fri Jul 10 2009

All: Obituary: Mark Volpe

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        1.    Mark Aronoff, Obituary: Mark Volpe

Message 1: Obituary: Mark Volpe
Date: 10-Jul-2009
From: Mark Aronoff <morphomemanmac.com>
Subject: Obituary: Mark Volpe
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With great sadness, the Stony Brook University Linguistics Department reports the passing
on July 7, 2009 of Mark Volpe, a distinguished alumnus of the department. Prof. Volpe
completed his dissertation, Japanese Morphology and its theoretical consequences:
Derivational morphology in Distributed Morphology, in 2005. It is online at
http://semlab1.sbs.sunysb.edu/publications/2006/mark.j.volpe.

Both before coming to Stony Brook and after his stay with us, Prof. Volpe taught at a
number of institutions in Japan, including University of Fukuoka and Kyushu University.
Prof. Volpe was the author of a number of articles, including the following:

Locatum and location verbs in Lexeme—Morpheme base morphology. Lingua 112: 103-
119. 2002.
Lexeme-morpheme based morphology, (with Robert Beard) in Handbook of Word
Formation, ed. by Pavel Stekauer and Rochelle Lieber, Springer. 2006.
The causative alternation and Japanese unaccusatives Snippets - Issue 4 - July 2001.
Open-class roots in closed-class contexts: a question for lexical insertion Snippets-Issue 5-
January 2002 (with Paolo Acquaviva).
Morpheme. Encyclopedia of Language & Linguistics, 2006. 274-276 (with Mark Aronoff).

Mark Volpe was a valuable colleague and friend, a highly original thinker with a deep
knowledge of Japanese and its dialects from whom many of us learned much. We will miss
him greatly.

Linguistic Field(s): Not Applicable

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