* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *
LINGUIST List 20.3033

Wed Sep 09 2009

Calls: Pragmatics, Sociolinguistics/Switzerland

Editor for this issue: Amy Brunett <brunettlinguistlist.org>


LINGUIST is pleased to announce the launch of an exciting new feature: Easy Abstracts! Easy Abs is a free abstract submission and review facility designed to help conference organizers and reviewers accept and process abstracts online. Just go to: http://www.linguistlist.org/confcustom, and begin your conference customization process today! With Easy Abstracts, submission and review will be as easy as 1-2-3!
Directory
        1.    Pilar Garces Blitvich, 5th International Symposium on Politeness

Message 1: 5th International Symposium on Politeness
Date: 09-Sep-2009
From: Pilar Garces Blitvich <pgblitviuncc.edu>
Subject: 5th International Symposium on Politeness
E-mail this message to a friend

Full Title: 5th International Symposium on Politeness

Date: 30-Jun-2010 - 02-Jul-2010
Location: Basel, Switzerland
Contact Person: Miriam Locher
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://sympol.unibas.ch

Linguistic Field(s): Pragmatics; Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 15-Oct-2009

Meeting Description:

The aim of this panel is to bring together scholars of varied disciplines to explore the interconnections between face and identity in on/off line situations.

The studies of face and identity have formed the cornerstones of im-politeness theories and modern sociological thought respectively. However, despite their obvious conceptual proximity, little consideration has been given to the interrelation between face and identity (Spencer-Oatey 2007), at least within those approaches to the study of im-politeness phenomena derived from Brown and Levinson’s (1987) formative model (but see the work of scholars working within the North American School of Communication studies, among others Ting-Toomey and Kurogi 2005; Domenici and Littlejohn 2006).

However, the field of politeness research has of late experienced a shift towards discursive (Eelen 2001; Mills 2003; Watts 2003; Locher and Watts 2005) and face-constituting (Arundale 1999, 2006) approaches which allow for a dynamic construction of im-politeness while delving into the relationship between im-politeness and appropriate or politic behavior (Watts 2003; Locher and Watts 2005) in specific contexts.

The emphasis on im-politeness as a social, discursive phenomenon has led scholars (see Lambert-Graham 2007; Spencer-Oatey 2007; Locher 2008; Garces-Conejos Blitvich 2009, among others) to look for alternative ways to conceptualize and describe im-politeness. Identity theory (Joseph 2004; Bucholtz and Hall 2005; de Fina et al 2006; Benwell and Stokoe 2006) presents itself as a useful, alternative analytical tool.


Call for Papers:

This panel aims to further this discussion by including original papers that bring together notions of face and identity and apply them to the analysis of situated im-politeness.

Paper proposals dealing with, but not limited to, the following topics are welcome:

-Face and identity in web 2.0 sites
-Face and identity in traditional media
-Face and identity in professional settings
-Face, identity and gender
-Face, identity and bilingualism

Those scholars interested in contributing a paper to this panel are kindly requested to send a 400 word abstract to Pilar Garces Blitvich (pgblitviuncc.edu) by October 15th, 2009.

References:

Arundale, Robert B. (1999). An Alternative Model and Ideology of Communication for An Alternative to Politeness Theory. Pragmatics 9, 1: 119-153.
Arundale, Robert B. (2006). Face as Relational and Interactional: A Communication Framework for Research on Face, Facework and Politeness. Journal of Politeness Research 2: 193-216.
Benwell, Bethan and Stokoe, Elizabeth (2006). Discourse and Identity. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Brown, Penelope and Levinson, Steven (1987). Politeness: Some Universals of Language Usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Bucholtz, Mary and Kira Hall (2005). Identity and Interaction: a Socio-cultural Linguistic Approach. Discourse Studies 7, 4-5: 585-614.
de Fina, Anna, Schiffrin, Deborah, Bamberg, Michael (eds.) (2006). Discourse and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Domenici, Kathy and Littlejohn, Stephen. (2006). Facework: Bridging Theory and
Practice. Thousand Oaks, CA; Sage.
Eelen, Gino. (2001). A Critique of Politeness Theories. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.
Garcés-Conejos Blitvich, Pilar. Impoliteness and Identity in the American News Media: The "Culture Wars". Journal of Politeness Research 5, 2: 273-304.
Lambert-Graham, Sage. (2007). Disagreeing to agree: Conflict, (Im)politeness and Identity in a Computer-Mediated Community. Journal of Pragmatics 39: 742-
759.
Locher, Miriam (2008). Relational Work, Politeness and Identity Construction.
In Antos Gerd, Eija Ventola and Tilo Weber (eds.) Handbook of Applied Linguistics. Volume 2: Interpersonal Communication. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 509-540.
Locher, Miriam A. and Watts, Richard J. (2005). Politeness Theory and Relational Work. Journal of Politeness Research 1: 9-13.
Joseph, John. (2004). Language and Identity: National, Ethnic, Religious. New
York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Mills, Sarah. (2003). Gender and Politeness. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge
University Press.
Spencer-Oatey, Helen (2007). Theories of Identity and the Analysis of Face. Journal of Pragmatics 39: 639-656.
Ting-Toomey, Stella and Kurogi, Atsuko (2005). Facework Competence in Intercultural Conflict: An Updated Face-negotiation Theory. International Journal of Intercultural Relations 22: 187-225.
Watts, Richard. (2003). Politeness. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.



Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue




Please report any bad links or misclassified data

LINGUIST Homepage | Read LINGUIST | Contact us

NSF Logo

While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed
on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.