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LINGUIST List 20.3653

Wed Oct 28 2009

Calls: Ling & Literature, Socioling, Translation/Lithuania

Editor for this issue: Kate Wu <katelinguistlist.org>


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        1.    Anna Espunya, Fictive Orality from the Crosslinguistic and Translational Perspectives

Message 1: Fictive Orality from the Crosslinguistic and Translational Perspectives
Date: 27-Oct-2009
From: Anna Espunya <anna.espunyagmail.com>
Subject: Fictive Orality from the Crosslinguistic and Translational Perspectives
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Full Title: Fictive Orality from the Crosslinguistic and Translational Perspectives

Date: 02-Sep-2010 - 05-Sep-2010
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
Contact Person: Anna Espunya
Meeting Email: anna.espunyagmail.com

Linguistic Field(s): Ling & Literature; Sociolinguistics; Text/Corpus
Linguistics; Translation

Call Deadline: 09-Nov-2009

Meeting Description:

Fictive Orality from the Crosslinguistic and Translational Perspectives

We are planning to submit a workshop proposal for the 43rd Annual Meeting of the
Societas Linguistica Europaea (2010, Vilnius), and invite papers from
prospective participants interested in the linguistic and textual analysis of
fictive orality.

Anna Espunya, Dept of Translation and Language Sciences, UPF, Barcelona,
Catalonia, Spain
Jenny Brumme, Dept of Translation and Language Sciences, UPF, Barcelona,
Catalonia, Spain

Call for Papers

The research group CEDIT (Center for Discourse and Translation Studies) at
Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain) is working on the topic of
fictive orality from the crosslinguistic and translational perspectives. We are
planning to submit a workshop proposal for the 43rd Annual Meeting of the
Societas Linguistica Europaea (2010, Vilnius), and invite papers from
prospective participants interested in the linguistic and textual analysis of
fictive orality.

Workshops are organized around 30-minute presentations (20 + 10). A one-day
workshop in principle contains seven or eight presentations plus a slot for
final discussion.

Abstracts should not exceed 500 words (exclusive of references) and should state
research questions, approach, methodology, data and (expected) results. The
deadline for submission to us is November 9. Abstracts should be sent to the
following e-mail address gmail . com > (please ignore
percentage signs). If our workshop proposal is accepted, authors will have to
submit their abstracts individually to the scientific committee of the SLE 2010
conference.

Workshop Description
In order to provide credibility to dialogue present in planned discourses (both
fiction and non-fiction), authors select a set of linguistic features while
rejecting others. Choices are restricted by various factors ranging from the
linguistic medium to the literary conventions of the receiving society. Given
the current extensive use of simulated speech in a context of increasing
translation needs (a form of language contact), it is a reasonable goal to
improve our knowledge about this variety in general and about its manifestations
in particular languages.

The theoretical point of departure is the model put forward in Koch &
Oesterreicher (1990) and later works by the authors (see, e.g. Oesterreicher
1997). One of its basic assumptions is the distinction between linguistic medium
(phonic vs. graphic) and linguistic conception (oral vs. written), the latter
corresponding to notions such as "unplanned" vs. "planned" and "informal" vs.
"formal" in other models. In this model, the conceptional dichotomy "oral" vs.
"written" is abandoned in favour of a continuum defined by the poles "language
of immediacy" (Sprache der Nähe) and "language of distance" (Sprache der
Distanz), independent of medium or channel. Thus, the language of proximity may
be of oral conception, even if it occurs in a written medium, while the language
of distance may be of written conception, even if it occurs in a spoken medium.
Fictive orality constitutes a specific, structured modality placed along this
continuum.

The writer of constructed dialogue draws from linguistic and textual features
that may be either universal or language particular (for instance, due to
historical processes). These elements are assigned functions which may or may
not match their functions in the language of proximity. The goal of linguistic
analysis of a given discourse is to identify the set of resources that
constitute the model of fictive orality chosen by its author and the
relationship with the social and historical context in which it was produced.

Any translator confronted with the source text's fictive dialogue (literary, non
literary, theatre, film, multimodal translation) is dealing not with isolated
choices but with a variety in its own right. Contrary to popular belief,
linguistic features of fictive orality occurring in a source text do not always
map onto expressions from one single variety of the target language such as the
colloquial variety. Instead, translators draw from a variety of resources to
reconstruct the model realized in the source text or to build a new one. The
goal of the analysis of a given translated work is then to identify the
strategies used and the influence of target culture norms on those decisions.

In this workshop we are seeking to gather and discuss data from as many European
languages and literary traditions as possible. The topics that we would like to
address include:

a) What are the universal traits of the language of immediacy that are
incorporated in fictive orality?
b) What are the language-specific traits of the language of immediacy that are
incorporated in fictive orality?

We welcome analysis on all linguistic levels relevant to fictive orality in the
graphic media.

(i) On the syntax level:
- syntactic phenomena typical of speech, e.g. ellipsis
- types of units that appear in fictive dialogue (sentences, phrases,
non-constituents, etc.)
- preferred types of sentence connection
- structures motivated by information packaging purposes
- representation of disfluencies, etc.

(ii) On the pragmatic level:
- conversation management resources
- speech acts (typology, representation)
- pragmatic markers, modalisers, etc.

(iii) On the lexical level:
- fixed expressions
- metaphorical expressions
- evoked and expressive meanings, etc.

Koch, Peter; Oesterreicher, Wulf (1990). Gesprochene Sprache in der Romania:
Französisch, Italienisch, Spanisch. Tübingen: Max Niemeyer.
Koch, Peter; Oesterreicher, Wulf (2001): 'Langage parlé et langage écrit'. In:
Holtus, Günter; Metzeltin, Michael; Schmitt, Christian (eds.), Lexikon der
Romanistischen Linguistik, vol. I/2, Tübingen: Max Niemeyer, 584-628.
Koch, Peter; Oesterreicher, Wulf (2007): Lengua hablada en la Romania: español,
francés, italiano. Translated by A. López Serena. Madrid: Gredos. (BRH II; 448).
Koch, Peter (2005): 'Parlato / scritto' quale dimensione centrale della
variazione linguistica. In: Burr, Elisabeth (ed.), Innovazione e tradizione.
Linguistica e filologia alle soglie del nuovo millennio. Firenze: Cesati, 41-56.
Oesterreicher, Wulf (1997). 'Types of Orality in Text'. In: Bakker, Egbert;
Kahane, Ahuvia (eds.), Written Voices, Spoken Signs. Tradition, Performance, and
the Epic Text. Cambridge, Mass. / London: Harvard University Press, 190-214.
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