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LINGUIST List 20.4196

Tue Dec 08 2009

Diss: Historical Ling: Estill: 'The Development of Tone in Panjabi...'

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        1.    Carrie Estill, The Development of Tone in Panjabi as Evidenced in the Poetic Alliteration Patterns

Message 1: The Development of Tone in Panjabi as Evidenced in the Poetic Alliteration Patterns
Date: 08-Dec-2009
From: Carrie Estill <caestillaol.com>
Subject: The Development of Tone in Panjabi as Evidenced in the Poetic Alliteration Patterns
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Institution: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Program: Department of Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 1985

Author: Carrie Anne Estill

Dissertation Title: The Development of Tone in Panjabi as Evidenced in the Poetic Alliteration Patterns

Dissertation URL: http://ling.wisc.edu/abstracts/estill.htm

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics

Dissertation Director:
Valdis Zeps
Frances Wilson
Robin Cooper
Andrew L. Sihler
Donald A Becker

Dissertation Abstract:

Since the Nineteenth Century scholars have observed that Panjabi, unlike
the other Indo-European languages of India, has tone. My thesis is divided
into four chapters: (I) A short description of Pnajabi phonology. (II) A
review of the literature concerning Panjabi tone. (III) A discussion of
tone in languages other than Panjabi. (IV) Evidence from poetry supporting
my thesis that the tonal phenomenon in Panjabi is recent. In the last
chapter I examine poetry from the Adi Granth, poetry by Shah Husain, the
Epic of Hira and Ranjha by Varis Shah, and poetry by many modern poets.
Evidence for initial alliteration between voiceless unaspirates and voiced
aspirates is common only in the work of the modern poets, suggesting that
the changes in tone occurred recently, perhaps as recently as the
Nineteenth Century.



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