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LINGUIST List 20.4278

Sun Dec 13 2009

Calls: Applied Ling, Discourse Analysis,Socioling/Poland

Editor for this issue: Kate Wu <katelinguistlist.org>


LINGUIST is pleased to announce the launch of an exciting new feature: Easy Abstracts! Easy Abs is a free abstract submission and review facility designed to help conference organizers and reviewers accept and process abstracts online. Just go to: http://www.linguistlist.org/confcustom, and begin your conference customization process today! With Easy Abstracts, submission and review will be as easy as 1-2-3!
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        1.    Andrzej Lyda, 2nd International PRISEAL Conference

Message 1: 2nd International PRISEAL Conference
Date: 10-Dec-2009
From: Andrzej Lyda <andrzej.lydaus.edu.pl>
Subject: 2nd International PRISEAL Conference
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Full Title: 2nd International PRISEAL Conference
Short Title: PRISEAL 2

Date: 09-Jun-2011 - 11-Jun-2011
Location: Sosnowiec / Katowice, Poland
Contact Person: Andrzej Lyda
Meeting Email: priseal2us.edu.pl
Web Site: http://ija.us.edu.pl/sub/prisealweb/index.html

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics; Discourse Analysis; Pragmatics;
Sociolinguistics; Translation

Subject Language(s): English (eng)

Call Deadline: 15-Nov-2010

Meeting Description:

In the Introduction to the Special Issue: English for Research Publication
Purposes Journal of English for Academic Purposes 7 (2008) the underlying idea
of PRISEAL conferences has been expressed as follows by the organisers of
PRISEAL 1, Margaret Cargill and Sally Burgess:

English for Research Publication Purposes (ERPP) can be thought of as a branch
of EAP addressing the concerns of professional researchers and post-graduate
students who need to publish in peer-reviewed international journals. It is now
almost a truism to say that the vast majority of these journals are published in
English, and that this presents considerable challenges to users of English as
an Additional Language (EAL), regardless of the field in which they work.While
EAP programs in universities can address some of these needs in a general way,
the real-life, specific issues for academics whose first language is not English
wishing to publish in English are often broader and more complex. (Margaret
Cargill and Sally Burgess 2008:75)

Many of such issues were addressed during PRISEAL 1 but many other still remain
to be explored from as many angles as possible.

While the leading theme of PRISEAL 1 was 'peripherality' as opposed to 'the
mainstream', we wish to look at the same issue in terms of niches occupied by
users of English as an Additional Language. How much of what is done in the
niches gets outside? Is what is done in the niches what gets outside? To what
extent is English a distorting mirror of the original ideas? Are the niches
isolated?

This conference is addressed to journal publishers, editors and referees,
authors' editors and translators, conference interpreters and translators, ERPP
teachers, materials writers and course designers, and applied linguists working
in fields such as genre analysis (especially academic genres) and intercultural
rhetoric.

Call for Papers

Title: 2nd International PRISEAL Conference:
Publishing and Presenting Research Internationally:
Issues for Speakers of English as an Additional Language

Leading Theme Occupying niches: Interculturality, cross-culturality
and aculturality in academic research

While the leading theme of PRISEAL 1 was 'peripherality' as opposed to 'the
mainstream', we wish to look at the activity of the academic discourse community
in terms of niches occupied by users of English as an Additional Language. How
much of what is done in the niche gets outside? Is what is done in the niche
what gets outside? To what extent is English a distorting mirror of the original
ideas? Are these niches isolated linguistic and cultural cavities or are they
connected by channels of English, or perhaps Englishes, and other languages?
What part of one's culture/language is gained or lost in the process of
publishing in English? With our leading theme set at 'Occupying niches:
Interculturality, cross-culturality and aculturality in academic research', we
hope to sparkle a vivid discussion on what is culture-bound, culture-free and
'cultured' in the academic community and its practices.

Within the bounds of this perspective we invite proposals from the areas of
applied linguistics, discourse analysis, translation and interpreting, and
cultural studies. Aiming at a better understanding of the complex situation of
users of English as an Additional Language we invite submissions from journal
publishers, editors and referees, authors' editors and translators, conference
interpreters, ERPP teachers, materials writers and course designers, and applied
linguists.

Main sections proposed:
- Spoken and written discourse analysis
- Research genres
- Translation and interpreting

Submissions and Registration:
We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers. 300-word abstracts should be
e-mailed to: by 15 November 2010.

The abstracts should be sent as an attachment to an email message, in either
.doc, .rtf or .pdf format using 2,5 cm (1 inch) margins and a 12 pt font. Each
abstract should indicate the title of the talk, and may include references. For
abstracts please use this form.The body of the email message should contain the
following information: The name(s) of the author(s), affiliation, title of the
paper and contact details (postal and email address).

The authors will be notified of acceptance by 15 December 2010. Registration
opens on 15 January 2011.

Further information on the venue, registration, social activities and
accommodation will be announced on the conference website and in the second call
for papers in the course of the next few months.
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