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LINGUIST List 21.133

Sat Jan 09 2010

Books: Ling Theories/Typology/Cognitive Science: Sanders, Sweetser (Eds)

Editor for this issue: Hannah Morales <hannahlinguistlist.org>


Links to the websites of all LINGUIST's supporting publishers are available at the end of this issue.
Directory
        1.    Julia Ulrich, Causal Categories in Discourse and Cognition: Sanders, Sweetser (Eds)

Message 1: Causal Categories in Discourse and Cognition: Sanders, Sweetser (Eds)
Date: 23-Dec-2009
From: Julia Ulrich <julia.ulrichdegruyter.com>
Subject: Causal Categories in Discourse and Cognition: Sanders, Sweetser (Eds)
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Title: Causal Categories in Discourse and Cognition
Series Title: Cognitive Linguistics Research [CLR] 44
Published: 2009
Publisher: De Gruyter Mouton
                http://www.degruyter.com/mouton

Book URL: http://www.degruyter.de/cont/fb/sk/detailEn.cfm?id=IS-9783110224412-1

Editor: Ted Sanders
Editor: Eve E. Sweetser
Electronic: ISBN: 9783110224429 Pages: 249 Price: Europe EURO 111.00
Hardback: ISBN: 9783110224412 Pages: 249 Price: Europe EURO 99.95
Abstract:

All languages of the world provide their speakers with linguistic means to
express causal relations in discourse. Causal connectives and causative
auxiliaries are among the salient markers of causal construals. Cognitive
scientists and linguists are interested in how much of this causal modeling
is specific to a given culture and language, and how much is characteristic
of general human cognition. Speakers of English, for example, can choose
between because and since or between therefore and so. How different are
these from the choices made by Dutch speakers, who speak a closely related
language, but (unlike English speakers) have a dedicated marker for
non-volitional causality (daardoor)?

The central question in this volume is: What parameters of categorization
shape the use of causal connectives and auxiliary verbs across languages?
The book discusses how differences between even quite closely related
languages (English, Dutch, Polish) can help us to elaborate the typology of
levels and categories of causation represented in language. In addition,
the volume demonstrates convergence of linguistic, corpus-linguistic and
psycholinguistic methodologies in determining cognitive categories of
causality. The basic notion of causality appears to be an ideal linguistic
phenomenon to provide an overview of methods and, perhaps more importantly,
invoke a discussion on the most adequate methodological approaches to study
fundamental issues in language and cognition.

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science
                            Linguistic Theories
                            Typology

Subject Language(s): Dutch (nld)
                            English (eng)
                            Polish (pol)

Written In: English (eng )

See this book announcement on our website:
http://linguistlist.org/get-book.html?BookID=45372


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-------------- Major Supporters --------------
Cascadilla Press http://www.cascadilla.com/
De Gruyter Mouton http://www.degruyter.com/mouton
Edinburgh University Press http://www.eup.ed.ac.uk/
Georgetown University Press http://www.press.georgetown.edu
John Benjamins http://www.benjamins.com/
Oxford University Press http://www.oup.com/us
Routledge (Taylor and Francis) http://www.routledge.com/
University of Toronto Press http://www.utpjournals.com/

------------- Other Supporting Publishers -------------
Linguistic Association of Finland http://www.ling.helsinki.fi/sky/
St. Jerome Publishing Ltd http://www.stjerome.co.uk




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