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LINGUIST List 21.2001

Tue Apr 27 2010

Calls: Semantics, Typology/Netherlands

Editor for this issue: Di Wdzenczny <dilinguistlist.org>


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        1.    Jenny Doetjes, Workshop on Pluractionality: Towards a typology of verbal plurality

Message 1: Workshop on Pluractionality: Towards a typology of verbal plurality
Date: 27-Apr-2010
From: Jenny Doetjes <j.doetjeshum.leidenuniv.nl>
Subject: Workshop on Pluractionality: Towards a typology of verbal plurality
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Full Title: Workshop on Pluractionality: Towards a typology of verbal
plurality

Date: 26-Aug-2010 - 26-Aug-2010
Location: Leiden, Netherlands
Contact Person: Jenny Doetjes
Meeting Email: J.Doetjeshum.leidenuniv.nl
Web Site: http://www.hum.leiden.edu/lucl/news-events/news/workshop-
pluractionality.html

Linguistic Field(s): Semantics; Typology

Call Deadline: 01-Jun-2010

Meeting Description:

In this workshop we would like to bring together researchers working on
pluractionality both in traditional pluractional languages and on similar
phenomena in languages that do not have morphological marking of event
plurality. The goal of this workshop is to increase the understanding of
various aspects of pluractionality.

Call For Papers

Workshop on pluractionality: towards a typology of verbal plurality

Invited speaker: Sigrid Beck (Universität Tübingen)

In the descriptive literature the phenomenon of pluractionality has a long
history even if not necessarily under this label. Quite recently, there has
also been an increase of interest in the phenomenon in the formal semantic
literature, especially since Lasersohn (1995). Researchers have been
looking not only at traditionally pluractional languages such as many
Amerindian or African languages, but also at languages such as Germanic
or Romance where certain phenomena and constructions - often
traditionally analyzed as aspectual - have been analyzed as involving
pluractional operators (see for instance Van Geenhoven 2005). This raises
the question of what the limits of pluractionality are - what should be
included and what is outside the domain of the phenomenon. For that
purpose, cooperation of descriptive and formal linguists is crucial as the
theoretical predictions of various approaches need to be compared with the
empirical findings in many different languages.

In this workshop we would like to bring together researchers working on
pluractionality both in traditional pluractional languages and on similar
phenomena in languages that do not have morphological marking of event
plurality. The goal of this workshop is to increase the understanding of
various aspects of pluractionality. We are interested in talks discussing the
relation between the following formally different ways of encoding event
plurality: morphological pluractionality and event plurality marked by other
means (e.g. by the use of specific constructions). This kind of investigation
necessarily leads to the relation between pluractionality and aspect, as the
so called pluractional constructions in ''non-pluractional'' languages
generally manifest only the temporal ''flavor'' of pluractionality (roughly
corresponding to the so called event number from Corbett 2000). It is clear
that pluractionality and aspect or aktionsart are closely related categories.
However, the exact nature of the connection remains elusive. In connection
to that it is important to look at issues such as the relation between temporal
pluractionality (or, event number, potentially identical to certain ''aspects'')
and participant-based pluractionality (or, participant number). Participant-
based pluractionality is not really comparable to aspect, although many
languages do use a single marker for both temporal and participant-based
plurality. Apart from these inter-related issues, the workshop is open to
other contributions that will throw new light on pluractionality, e.g., the
specialization in meaning in the case of multiple pluractional markers in a
language, comparison of plurality in the nominal and verbal domains, or
interaction of pluractional morphology with other kinds of verbal
morphology.

Date: 26 August 2010, following on the 40th Colloquium on African
Languages and Linguistics (CALL)

Venue: Leiden University Centre for Linguistics

Organizers: Kateřina Součková and Jenny Doetjes

Abstracts: Anonymous 1 page anonymous abstracts must be submitted prior
to 1 June 2010 by email to CALL AT hum DOT leidenuniv DOT nl; make
sure you write your name, email address and affiliation in the mail and
mention 'Workshop on pluractionality' in the subject line.

Notification of acceptance: 15 June 2010
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