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LINGUIST List 21.2211

Thu May 13 2010

Diss: Syntax: Ishizuka: 'Toward a Unified Analysis of Passives in ...'

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        1.    Tomoko Ishizuka, Toward a Unified Analysis of Passives in Japanese: A cartographic minimalist approach

Message 1: Toward a Unified Analysis of Passives in Japanese: A cartographic minimalist approach
Date: 12-May-2010
From: Tomoko Ishizuka <ishizuka.tomokogmail.com>
Subject: Toward a Unified Analysis of Passives in Japanese: A cartographic minimalist approach
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Institution: University of California, Los Angeles
Program: Department of Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2010

Author: Tomoko Ishizuka

Dissertation Title: Toward a Unified Analysis of Passives in Japanese: A cartographic minimalist approach

Dissertation URL: http://ling.auf.net/lingBuzz/001036

Linguistic Field(s): Syntax

Subject Language(s): Japanese (jpn)

Dissertation Director:
Dominique Sportiche
Hilda J Koopman
Anoop Mahajan

Dissertation Abstract:

This dissertation re-examines and re-analyzes the extensively studied
passive voice system in Japanese within a current version of Generative
Grammar-Cartographic Minimalism. Contrary to the standard assumption that
Japanese passives consist of (at least) two distinct types of passives,
direct and indirect (gapless), this dissertation motivates a unified
movement analysis and extends Collins' (2005) smuggling analysis to
Japanese passives. It is shown here that a unified movement account is not
only theoretically desirable but also feasible and independently supported.

This dissertation establishes the following: (i) the dichotomy between
direct and indirect passives is not only unnecessary but also empirically
inadequate, (ii) the derivation of all passives involves movement, (iii)
the passive morpheme -rare never assigns a theta-role, and (iv)
case-markers and postpositions disappear under movement - in both
relativization and passivization - in Japanese. The last property makes it
difficult to identify the source position of the derived subject in
Japanese passives. It is shown here that the derived subject always
originates in the complement domain of -rare and corresponds to an
accusative, dative, genitive, or oblique source in the active counterpart.

The analysis pursued here is a modular one in which interactions among the
lexical properties of the morpheme -(r)are, independently-motivated
principles of Universal Grammar, and the derivational path taken by the DP
occupying the nominative position together give rise to different clusters
of properties observed with different passive types. The dissertation also
addresses the issues of interspeaker variability, the requirement of
supportive context, and their implications for differences in individual
grammars.



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