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LINGUIST List 21.2496

Mon Jun 07 2010

Calls: Disc Analysis, Philosophy of Lang, Pragmatics, Socioling/Japan

Editor for this issue: Di Wdzenczny <dilinguistlist.org>


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        1.    Etsuko Oishi, 3rd One-day Workshop on Pragmatics

Message 1: 3rd One-day Workshop on Pragmatics
Date: 06-Jun-2010
From: Etsuko Oishi <etsukofujijoshi.ac.jp>
Subject: 3rd One-day Workshop on Pragmatics
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Full Title: 3rd One-day Workshop on Pragmatics

Date: 09-Sep-2010 - 09-Sep-2010
Location: Sapporo, Japan
Contact Person: Etsuko Oishi
Meeting Email: etsukofujijoshi.ac.jp

Linguistic Field(s): Discourse Analysis; Philosophy of Language;
Pragmatics; Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Jul-2010

Meeting Description:

3rd One-day Workshop on Pragmatics: Context, Contextualization and
Entextualization, at Fuji Women's University in Sapporo

Dates:
9th of September, 2010
Plenary Speaker:
Anita Fetzer, University of Wuerzburg,

Organized by:
Department of English Language and Culture, Fuji Women's University, Kita
16 Nishi 2, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 001-0016, Japan

The goal of this workshop is to examine the complexity of context (and its
multifaceted and multilayered nature) and communicative acts in context.
Researchers in related areas, including pragmatics, discourse analysis,
sociolinguistics, and the philosophy of language, are invited to join.

Second Call for Papers

Abstracts are invited for talks (25 minutes + 15 minutes discussion) on any
topic related to the workshop topic, 'Context, Contextualization and
Entextualization'.

Context, Contextualization and Entextualization

Context can no longer be seen as an analytic prime but needs to be
conceived of as a relational construct anchored to the premises of
indexicality and intentionality. Rather than being looked upon as an external
constraint on linguistic performance, context relates communicative action, it
relates communicative acts and their surroundings, it relates individual
participants and their individual surroundings, and it relates the set of
individual participants and their communicative acts to their surroundings.
Under this interpretation of context, communication is both context-creating
and context-dependent (Bateson 1972) and in communication context is
imported and invocated (Levinson 2003). In discourse, context is analysed
as a product of language use, as interactionally constructed and as
negotiated. Constructed context is also foregrounded in the discourse, as is
explained by the concept of entextualization, which is the process by which
texts are produced by extracting discourse from its original context and
reifying it as a bounded object (Park and Bucholtz 2009).

Context has been conceptualized with respect to the dichotomies of figure
versus ground, and given-and-there versus re-constructed, it has been
assigned the status of a dynamic construct, and it has been looked upon as
never saturated (Goodwin and Duranti 1992). Furthermore, it has been
assigned the status of a relational construct (Fetzer and Akman 2002)
relating communicative acts and their surroundings, relating communicative
acts, relating individual actors and their surroundings, and relating the set of
individual actors and their communicative acts to their surroundings. It has
been further refined by the differentiation between social context,
sociocultural context, linguistic context (or co-text) and cognitive context,
and between micro, meso and macro contexts (Fetzer 2004).

Degrees of connectedness between context and communicative acts are
subject to debate. Such connectedness might be taken minimally as the one
between indexicals and the context, or as pragmatic ''situatedness'' of
communicative acts in context (Bach 1994, Cappelen and Lepore 2005,
Kaplan 1989, Mey 2001, Recanati 2004).

The goal of this workshop is to examine the complexity of context (and its
multifaceted and multilayered nature) and communicative acts in context,
tackling one (or more) of the following aspects:

- the connectedness between the indexicality of social action and context(s)
- the connectedness between intentionality of communicative action and
context(s)
- the connectedness between illocutionary acts and context(s)
- the connectedness between micro contexts and their embedding contexts
(for instance, linguistic
constructions seen as a constitutive part of utterances; locutionary and
illocutionary acts seen as
constitutive parts of speech acts; or meta-representations; or illocutionary-
force-indicating devices,
contextualization cues or other types of connectives)
- the connectedness between meso contexts and their embedding contexts
(for instance, genre, speech
event, activity type, frame or communicative project)
- the connectedness between macro context (for instance, culture,
institution
and society) and their
embedded meso/micro contexts
- context(s) interactionally constructed and negotiated in discourse
- entextualization of producing texts

References
Bach, Kent (1994): Conversational implicature. Mind and Language 9, 124-
162.
Bateson, Gregory (1972): Steps to an ecology of mind. New York: Chandler
Publishing Company.
Cappelen, Herman and Lepore, Ernie (2005): Insensitive Semantics.
Malden, MA: Blackwell.
Fetzer, Anita and Akman, Varol (2002): Contexts of social action: guest
editors' introduction. Language and Communication 22(4): 391-402.
Fetzer, Anita (2004): Recontextualizing context: grammaticality meets
appropriateness. Amsterdam: Benjamins.
Goodwin, Charles and Duranti, Alessandro (1992): Rethinking context: an
introduction. In A. Duranti and C. Goodwin (eds.), Rethinking Context.
Language as an Interactive Phenomenon, Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press, 1-42.
Kaplan, David (1989): Demonstratives. In J. Almog, J. Perry, and H.
Wettstein (eds.), Themes from Kaplan. Oxford: Oxford University Press,
481-563.
Levinson, Stephen C. (2003): Contextualizing 'contextualization cues'. In:
Eerdmans, Susan, Prevignano, Carlo and Thibault, Paul (eds.), Language
and interaction. Discussions with John J. Gumperz. Amsterdam: Benjamins,
31-40.
Mey, Jacob L. (2001): Pragmatics. Oxford: Blackwell.
Park, Joseph Sung-Yul and Bucholtz, Mary (2009): Public transcripts:
entextualization and linguistic
representation in institutional contexts. Text & Talk 5, 485-502.
Recanati, Fran├žois (2004): Literal meaning. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.

Please send a one-page abstract with a separate page specifying the
authors' name, affiliation, postal address, and e-mail address, to the
addresses below before the 1st of July (the message title should be
'Context, Contextualization and Entextualization'). Abstracts will be blind
peer-reviewed, and notification of acceptance will be around the 15th of
July, 2010.

engdeptfujijoshi.ac.jp
Department of English Language and Culture, Fuji Women's University, Kita
16 Nishi 2, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 001-0016, Japan

Web Site: http://dept.fujijoshi.ac.jp/ecce/workshop_2010.html

For further enquiries:
Etsuko Oishi
Fuji Women's University
Kita 16 Nishi 2, Kita-ku,
Sapporo 001-0016, Japan
tel: +81 (0)11 736 5395
fax: +81 (0)11 709 8541
e-mail: etsukofujijoshi.ac.jp
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