* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *
LINGUIST List 21.2643

Fri Jun 18 2010

Diss: Cog. Sci: Sharma: 'Conceptualization to Speak About Natural ...'

Editor for this issue: Mfon Udoinyang <mfonlinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.cfm.
Directory
        1.    Dhruv Sharma, Conceptualization to Speak About Natural Scenes in Children & Adults: An eye movements study

Message 1: Conceptualization to Speak About Natural Scenes in Children & Adults: An eye movements study
Date: 18-Jun-2010
From: Dhruv Sharma <dhruvlogophilia.in>
Subject: Conceptualization to Speak About Natural Scenes in Children & Adults: An eye movements study
E-mail this message to a friend

Institution: Centre of Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences, Allahabad
Program: MA Cognitive Science
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2009

Author: Dhruv Raj Sharma

Dissertation Title: Conceptualization to Speak About Natural Scenes in Children & Adults: An eye movements study

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science

Dissertation Director:
Ramesh Kumar Mishra

Dissertation Abstract:

To produce a sentence requires speakers to co-ordinate the production of
words, so that they are ready for articulation and can be accessed by the
production mechanism upon demand. Studies in Psycholinguistics have
traditionally found these processes to require about a quarter of a second.
Is this true for both children and adults? Or should we expect either
population to be faster on the task? We here examine possible age-related
differences in sentence production across natural images of varying
complexity. Speakers described natural scenes depicting both transitive and
intransitive verbs, and either a single or two human actors, using or not
using an object. The latency of speech across the three different kinds of
images suggests that children are faster. Also, the number of fixations,
and the number of entries to the different image regions, are more for
children. However, other eye-tracking measures (e.g. dwell times, dwell
percentages, and average fixation duration times) are more for adults,
suggesting a different pattern of attention allocation than that of children.



Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue



Page Updated: 18-Jun-2010

Supported in part by the National Science Foundation       About LINGUIST    |   Contact Us       ILIT Logo
While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.