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LINGUIST List 21.2980

Mon Jul 19 2010

Diss: Morphology/Syntax: Wagner: 'Interlanguage Morphology ...'

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        1.    Thomas Wagner, Interlanguage Morphology: Irregular verbs in the mental lexicon of German-English interlanguage speakers

Message 1: Interlanguage Morphology: Irregular verbs in the mental lexicon of German-English interlanguage speakers
Date: 19-Jul-2010
From: Thomas Wagner <thomas.wagnerph-ooe.at>
Subject: Interlanguage Morphology: Irregular verbs in the mental lexicon of German-English interlanguage speakers
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Institution: University of Siegen
Program: English Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2009

Author: Thomas Wagner

Dissertation Title: Interlanguage Morphology: Irregular verbs in the mental lexicon of German-English interlanguage speakers

Linguistic Field(s): Morphology
                            Syntax

Subject Language(s): English (eng)
                            German, Standard (deu)
Language Family(ies): Germanic

Dissertation Director:
Annelie Knapp
Ingo Plag

Dissertation Abstract:

This book presents the first detailed empirical study of irregular verb
morphology in the German-English interlanguage. Starting with a theoretical
in-depth account of irregular verb morphology both in English and German,
three widely discussed theses about its nature are tested against a wide
range of empirical data, both from L1 and L2. Although the findings partly
confirm existing models and theories, the data also show the need for
further re-examination of some fundamental questions through associative or
probabilistic computer models. All in all this book provides a rigorous,
profound and thought-provoking discussion of the phenomenon in question.
This involves an up-to-date revision of existing theories as well as the
cross-linguistic examination of L1 and L2 data by an array of sophisticated
multivariate statistical models. The book is mainly directed towards
university students of German and English linguistics, psycholinguistics
and language acquisition at an advanced level.



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