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LINGUIST List 21.4147

Tue Oct 19 2010

Calls: General Ling, Historical Ling/USA

Editor for this issue: Di Wdzenczny <dilinguistlist.org>


LINGUIST is pleased to announce the launch of an exciting new feature: Easy Abstracts! Easy Abs is a free abstract submission and review facility designed to help conference organizers and reviewers accept and process abstracts online. Just go to: http://www.linguistlist.org/confcustom, and begin your conference customization process today! With Easy Abstracts, submission and review will be as easy as 1-2-3!
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        1.     Daniel Colon , Teaching & Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin America

Message 1: Teaching & Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin America
Date: 18-Oct-2010
From: Daniel Colon <dcolonnd.edu>
Subject: Teaching & Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin America
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Full Title: Teaching & Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin America
Short Title: STLILLA-2011

Date: 30-Oct-2011 - 02-Nov-2011
Location: Notre Dame, USA
Contact Person: Sharon Schierling
Meeting Email: sschierlnd.edu
Web Site: http://kellogg.nd.edu/STLILLA

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics; Historical Linguistics

Call Deadline: 06-Dec-2010

Meeting Description:

The Association for Teaching and Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin
America (ATLILLA) and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the
University of Notre Dame invite proposals for panels, individual papers,
round table discussions, interactive workshops, poster sessions, and
technological tools showcases to be presented at the second Symposium
on Teaching and Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin America
(STLILLA-2011). Proceedings of the Symposium will be published.

STLILLA-2011 will bring together instructors, practitioners, activists,
indigenous leaders, scholars, and learners of indigenous languages. The
symposium will focus on research and pedagogy related to the diverse
languages and cultures of indigenous populations in Latin America and the
Caribbean.

This second symposium will build on the accomplishments of the 2008
Symposium on Teaching Indigenous Languages of Latin America (STILLA),
the first initiative of this scope in the world, which resulted in the formation of
the Association for Teaching and Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin
America.

Call For Papers

The Association for Teaching and Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin
America (ATLILLA) and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the
University of Notre Dame invite proposals for panels, individual papers,
round table discussions, interactive workshops, poster sessions, and
technological tools showcases to be presented at the second Symposium
on Teaching and Learning Indigenous Languages of Latin America
(STLILLA-2011). Proceedings of the Symposium will be published.

The deadline for receipt of proposals is Monday, December 6, 2010.

Proposals will be accepted only through the online submission system.

Successful proposals will clearly indicate the relationship of the presentation
to the core symposium themes. Presentations should provide an opportunity
for symposium participants to engage with some of the challenging and
fundamental questions at the intersection of research and the teaching and
learning of Latin American indigenous languages.

Priority will be given to proposals that address one or more of the following
topics:

-Best practices, methodologies, and strategies in indigenous languages
pedagogy
-The interplay of research, theory, and practice in teaching and learning
indigenous languages
-Languages as vehicles to cultures and the world of living experience
-Language revitalization and documentation
-Distance learning / online courses
-Issues of dialectology and standardization in language instruction
-Impact of language attitudes and ideologies on teaching and learning
indigenous languages
-Intellectual, cultural, and political role of indigenous languages in Latin
America
-Indigenous languages, cultures, and identity
-Connecting, celebrating and maintaining traditions through teaching
-Assessment and evaluation of indigenous language learning
-Innovative technologies for teaching and learning indigenous languages
and cultures
-Effects of language policy and planning on the teaching and learning of
indigenous languages
-Language, literacy, and cultural practices
-Issues of bi-literacy and bilingual education in Latin America
-Music/musicology and the teaching and learning of indigenous languages
-Sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, and pragmatics in the teaching and
learning of indigenous languages
-Programmatic structure for Less Commonly Taught Language (LCTL)
instruction

General Proposal Guidelines

Proposals and presentations are welcome in English, Spanish or
Portuguese.
All proposals, regardless of type, must include the following:

-Name and title of the author/organizer, institutional affiliation, and contact
information
-Title of the proposed presentation
-Abstract (300 words)
-Indicate any equipment needs for your presentation
-Proposals for panels and round table discussions must also include:
-Name, title, and institutional affiliation for each additional participant
-Role or proposed topic to be covered by each additional participant (150
words)
-Indication that all proposed participants have been contacted and have
agreed to participate

The submission of proposals will be handled through an online submission
system. See below for specific guidelines on the different types of
proposals.

Types of Presentation

Presentations may be made in a number of formats, as listed below. You
must indicate the proposed format in your submission. The Conference
Committee may negotiate the proposed delivery format with the speaker.

Panel Presentations (75 minutes)

Individuals or institutional sponsors may propose to organize a panel of
presentations on a related subject, with each presenter offering a
perspective on the topic. Panels may include a chair/moderator, three or
four presenters, and a discussant. Depending on the number of panelists,
each presenter will be allotted 15-20 minutes to deliver his/her paper,
allowing 15 minutes at the end of the panel for commentary by a discussant
and/or questions.

Panel proposals must include information on all proposed participants and
must indicate that they have been contacted and agree to participate. The
individual submitting the proposal will be the sole contact person regarding
the panel.

Individual Papers (15-20 minutes)

Individual paper proposals provide an opportunity to present original
contributions to the research, theory, and practice of indigenous language
teaching and learning. Submissions should demonstrate an awareness of
relevant literature, and clearly indicate the importance of the proposed topic
to conference themes.

Upon acceptance, individual papers will be organized into panels of three or
four by subject. As described above, depending on the number of
participants on a given panel, individual presenters will have 15-20 minutes
to deliver the content of their individual papers.

Round Table Discussions (45 minutes)

Individuals or institutional sponsors may propose to organize a round table
discussion on a topic related to symposium themes. Like panels, round
table discussions are coordinated by an organizer/moderator, and offer
different perspectives on the proposed topic. However, rather than
focusing on the presentation of individual papers, presentation time for each
discussant is limited to 5-7 minutes. The majority of the session is devoted
to dialogue between the discussants and the audience.

In the best round tables, the speakers are aware of each other's work and
views, and they refute or support those views in their own talks. There's
real interchange, as well as the chance to go in-depth very quickly. They
are time-efficient and encourage audience participation in the discussion.

Proposals for round table discussions must include information on all
proposed discussants and must indicate that they have been contacted and
agree to participate. The individual submitting the proposal will be the sole
contact person regarding the round table discussion.

Interactive Workshops (45 minutes)

Presenters spend a short amount of time on the delivery of the pedagogical
concept, theory or model, and the majority of the session is devoted to
direct, hands-on participation by the attendees. Workshops are organized
to address a theme, discussion is informal and interactive, and papers are
not presented.

Poster Sessions / Technological Tools Showcases

Poster and technological tool presenters will be allocated a time slot within
the main symposium venue to showcase their pedagogical and
technological tool or model through a poster exhibition or a technological
tool showcase. Symposium participants will be able to view displays at their
leisure during session breaks.

Poster/technological tool proposals should briefly describe not only the
subject matter to be presented, but also how the material will be presented
visually.

Proposals will only be accepted through the online submission system and
the deadline is December 6, 2010. Each proposal will be reviewed by the
Proposal Review Committee.
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