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LINGUIST List 21.4733

Thu Nov 25 2010

Confs: Cog Sci, Pragmatics, Psycholing, Semantics/Germany

Editor for this issue: Di Wdzenczny <dilinguistlist.org>


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        1.     Stephanie Solt , Vague Quantities and Vague Quantifiers

Message 1: Vague Quantities and Vague Quantifiers
Date: 24-Nov-2010
From: Stephanie Solt <soltzas.gwz-berlin.de>
Subject: Vague Quantities and Vague Quantifiers
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Vague Quantities and Vague Quantifiers
Short Title: VQ2

Date: 08-Dec-2010 - 09-Dec-2010
Location: Berlin, Germany
Contact: Stephanie Solt
Contact Email: soltzas.gwz-berlin.de
Meeting URL: http://www.zas.gwz-berlin.de/workshop_vq2.html

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; Pragmatics; Psycholinguistics;
Semantics

Meeting Description:

The exchange of numerical information plays a central role in human
interaction. We talk about the number of people in a room, the weight of a
bag of grain, or the proportion of the population who supports a particular
candidate or proposition.

A crucial aspect of much of the quantity information we exchange is that it is
approximate, vague or incomplete. Vagueness may be signalled
linguistically via modifiers such as 'about' (about 50 books) and 'roughly'
(roughly 20 people). Even without modification, seemingly precise
numerical expressions may be interpreted approximately; for example,
'there were 100 people in the audience' is typically understood to mean
'about 100'. And most centrally, several highly frequent natural language
quantifiers, such as 'many', 'few', 'most' and 'a lot', are inherently vague.

The goal of the present workshop is to bring together diverse theoretical
perspectives on vague quantities and vague quantifiers, from fields
including linguistic semantics and pragmatics, logic (particularly fuzzy logic),
psycholinguistics, cognitive science and psychology. Specific topics to be
covered include:

- Linguistic treatments of vague quantifiers
- Granularity models of approximation
- Logics for vague quantity
- Generalized fuzzy quantifiers
- The mental representation and processing of vague or approximate
quantity
- Reasoning with vague quantifiers

Vague Quantities and Vague Quantifiers is funded by the European Science
Foundation (ESF) under the auspices of the EUROCORES Programme
LogICCC.

Organizers:
Uli Sauerland (ZAS Berlin)
Stephanie Solt (ZAS Berlin)
Chris Fermüller (Technische Universität Wien)

Wednesday, 8 December

9.30-9.45
Manfred Krifka (ZAS Berlin):
Welcome and Introduction

9.45-10.15
Stephanie Solt (ZAS Berlin):
Some cases of vague quantity

10.15-10.45
Alan Bale (Concordia):
Precision, vagueness, scales and the back-down phenomenon

10.45-11.15
Break

11.15-11.45
Denis Bonnay (Paris Ouest):
Vagueness at all orders

11.45-12.15
Pilar Delunde (UAB):
Model theory for fuzzy predicate languages

12.15-14.00
Lunch

14.00-14.30
Marian Klamer & Antoinette Schapper (Leiden):
Numbers and vague quantification in Alor Pantar languages: some initial
observations

14.30-15.00
Rasmus Baath, Uli Sauderland & Sverker Sikstrom (ZAS Berlin/Lund):
Quantifier use in English and German: an online study

15.00-15.30
Marijan Palmovic & Gordana Hrzica (U Zagreb):
Color terms and quantities: an experimental account

15.30-16.00
Break

16.00-16.30
Christoph Roschger (Technical University Vienna):
Contextual models of vagueness and vague quantifiers

16.30-17.30
Invited Speaker:
Vilem NOvak (U Ostrava):
On the theory of intermediate quantifiers

Thursday, 9 December

9.30-9.45
Eva Hoogland (ESF):
ESF, EUROCORES & LogICCC

9.45-10.45
Invited Speaker:
Justin Halberda (John Hopkins U):
TBD

10.45-11.15
Break

11.15-11.45
Raquel Fernandez (ILLC, Amsterdam):
Common ground and granularity of referring expressions

11.45-12.15
Chris Cummins (Cambridge):
Modelling the pragmatic effects of approximation

12.15-14.00
Lunch

14.00-14.30
Maria Spychalska(Utrecht):
Reasoning with vague quantifiers

14.30-15.00
Niki Pfeifer, Giuseppe Sanfilippo & Aangelo Gilio (LMU Munich):
Coherent probabilistic quantification, existential import and Aristotelian
syllogistics

15.00-15.30
Petr Cintula (Acad. of Sciences, Czech Republic):
On Hajek's fuzzy quantifiers ''probably'' and ''many''

15.30-16.00
Break

16.00-16.30
Chris Fermuller (Technical University Vienna):
Is there a role for fuzzy logic in linguistics?

16.30-17.30
Invited Speaker:
Jakub Szymanik (Stockholm U):
Complexity of quantifier processing
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