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LINGUIST List 21.4915

Mon Dec 06 2010

Qs: Complete List of Middle and Old English Affixes

Editor for this issue: Danielle St. Jean <daniellelinguistlist.org>


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        1.     Hagen Peukert , Complete List of Middle and Old English Affixes

Message 1: Complete List of Middle and Old English Affixes
Date: 30-Nov-2010
From: Hagen Peukert <hagen.peukertuni-hamburg.de>
Subject: Complete List of Middle and Old English Affixes
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Dear Colleagues,

Is there any exhaustive list of Middle English affixes, that is,
derivational as well as inflectional prefixes and suffixes for the entire
time range (1100-1500)? It definitely exists for Modern English, but I
have not encountered it for Old English or Middle English. Most
dictionaries would not list affixes separately. I would appreciate any
advice or reference.

My most recent project is to build a Morphological Parser for Old and
Middle English. This software takes Middle or Old English texts (or
tagged corpora such as the Penn Parsed Corpora of Historical English)
as an input and performs a quantitative analysis of the morphology.
This will allow us to see how certain affixes developed, how productive
they were (provided that you input enough data from the respective
time frames), and how they were actually used. Once the project is
finished, I would be glad to share the Parser with other researchers in
the field, e.g. on LINGUIST List.

Thank you,
Hagen Peukert

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics
                            Historical Linguistics
                            Morphology

Subject Language(s): Middle English (enm)
                            Old English (ang)

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