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LINGUIST List 21.745

Fri Feb 12 2010

Confs: Sociolinguistics/Denmark

Editor for this issue: Amy Brunett <brunettlinguistlist.org>


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        1.    Lin Solvang, Int. Summer School: Sociolinguistic Perspectives

Message 1: Int. Summer School: Sociolinguistic Perspectives
Date: 10-Feb-2010
From: Lin Solvang <lshum.ku.dk>
Subject: Int. Summer School: Sociolinguistic Perspectives
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Int. Summer School: Sociolinguistic Perspectives

Date: 07-Jun-2010 - 12-Jun-2010
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Contact: Lin Solvang
Contact Email: < click here to access email >
Meeting URL: http://www.dgcss.dk

Linguistic Field(s): Sociolinguistics

Meeting Description:

Course description: At the LANCHART Centre we have for many years now been concerned with the integration of various strands of sociolinguistics with a view towards fruitful collaboration and integration of results. This is an endeavour from which Ph. D. students as well as more senor researchers would benefit from seeing through. Thus we are all the more happy that we have been able to persuade a number of the discipline’s top researchers to focus in their presentations on the different research questions and neighbouring disciplines which they have worked with, in order to give a selected group of students from the global sociolinguistic community a chance to see their own project in a broader perspective.

Invitation:

The LANCHART Centre at University of Copenhagen is happy to invite PhD students from the international sociolinguistic community to send applications by March 20th for participation in:

International Summer School 2010
Sociolinguistic Perspectives, Copenhagen, 7-12 June

Plenary lecturers will be Shana Poplack (University of Ottawa, Canada), Dave Britain (University of Bern, Switzerland), Peter Auer (University of Freiburg, Germany), Nik Coupland (University of Cardiff, Wales) and Professor Brian Joseph (Ohio State University, USA). Course director and moderator will be Professor Frans Gregersen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark).

Location:

The summer school will take place at the University of Copenhagen. The administration of the LANCHART Centre’s address: Njalsgade 136, building 27, 5th floor, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, DENMARK. Please note that the exact location of each session will be announced upon arrival.

Application for participation:

We accept applications from PhD students, i.e. graduate students who have finished an MA and are working on a PhD project. You can read more about the summer school and fill out the registration form from our homepage www.dgcss.dk

You shall apply no later than April 15th and also include an abstract of your project of a maximum of 5 pages. Information about admittance will be sent out no later than May 3rd, 2010.

Course Fee:

Participation is free of charge if your application is accepted. Due to a grant from the Danish National Research Foundation under its International Talent Recruitment Programme, The LANCHART Centre will pay for all meals during the course (cf. the programme) and lodging at a hostel. However, participants will have to cover their travel costs and meals in connection with arrival and departure.

Course certificate and credits:

A course certificate will be issued, based on 80% active participation. 4,5 ECTS credits will be awarded by completion of the course.


PhD project presentations:

As a participating PhD student you are required to present your own project and discuss it with the lecturers and fellow students. You should therefore prepare a presentation lasting a maximum of 30 minutes, which will be followed by 30 minutes of discussion and feedback from faculty and audience.


Programme:

Monday, June 7th

9:00-9:30
Introduction and Welcome

9:30-10:30
Lecture by Shana Poplack: Historical Perspectives 1: Morpho-Syntactic Change

10:30-10:45
Tea and coffee

10:45-12:00
Workshop and plenary discussion

12:00-13:30
Lunch

13:30-15:30
Student Presentations

15:30-16:00
Tea and coffee

16:00-18:00
Student Presentations

19:00
Dinner

Tuesday, June 8th

9:30-10:30
Lecture by Brian D. Joseph: Historical Perspectives 2: Phonetic Change

10:30-10:45
Tea and coffee

10:45-12:00
Workshop and plenary discussion

12:00-13:30
Lunch

13:30-15:30
Student Presentations

15:30-16:00
Tea and coffee

16:00-18:00
Student Presentations

19:00
Dinner

Wednesday, June 9th

9:30-10:30
Lecture by Peter Auer: The Perspective from Dialectology

10:30-10:45
Tea and coffee

10:45-12:00
Workshop and plenary discussion

12:00-13:30
Lunch

19:00
Dinner

Thursday, June 10th

9:00-11:00
Student Presentations

11:00-11:30
Tea and coffee

11:30-12:30
Student Presentations

12:30-14:00
Lunch

14:00-18:00
Panel Discussion: What can Sociolinguists Learn from Neighbouring Disciplines.

19:00
Dinner

Friday, June 11th

9:30-10:30
Lecture by David Britain: The Perspective from Human Geography

10:30-10:45
Tea and coffee

10:45-12:00
Workshop and plenary discussion

12:00-13:30
Lunch

13:30-15:30
Student Presentations

15:30-16:00
Tea and coffee

16:00-18:00
Student Presentations

19:00
Dinner party

Saturday, June 12th

10:00-12:00
Student Presentations

12:00-13:30
Lunch

13:30-14:30
Lecture by Nik Coupland: The Delicate Relationships between the Various Perspectives and Interaction

14:30-14:45
Tea and coffee

14:45-16:00
Concluding Discussion

Departure

Lecturers:

Brian D. Joseph is Distinguished University Professor of Linguistics and the Kenneth E. Naylor Professor of South Slavic Linguistics at the Ohio State University. His main areas of interest are historical linguistics, Greek linguistics, Balkan linguistics, and morphological theory, with secondary areas of interest being language and ethnicity, Sanskrit linguistics, and Indo-European linguistics in general.

David Britain is Professor of Modern English Linguistics at the University of Bern. Until January 2010, he was senior lecturer at the University of Essex (Department of Language and Linguistics), and continues to supervise some Essex PhD students. His main research interests are language variation and change, dialect contact and new dialect formation, second dialect acquisition and the dialectology-human geography interface.

Shana Poplack is Distinguished University Professor, Canada Research Chair and director of the Sociolinguistics Laboratory at the University of Ottawa, Department of Linguistics. Her fields of interest are linguistic variation and change, constraints on language mixing, language contact and linguistic convergence, the genesis of African American Vernacular English, language ideology, normative prescription and praxis

Peter Auer is Professor of Germanic Philology (Linguistics) at the University of Freiburg, and currently one of the directors of the University of Freiburg’s Institute of Advanced Studies (FRIAS). Peter Auer’s research interests span bilingualism, sociolinguistics, interaction analysis, dialectology, syntax of spoken language, phonology, and prosody.

Nik Coupland is Professor at Cardiff University (School of English Communication and Philosophy). His research interests are sociolinguistics, including sociolinguistic theory, the sociolinguistics of Wales, language and globalization, speech style and social identity, intergenerational talk and the social meaning of numbers.

Frans Gregersen (course director) is Professor at the University of Copenhagen (Department of Scandinavian Studies and Linguistics) and head of The LANCHART centre. His primary research areas are sociolinguistic analyses of spoken and written Danish, history of the Danish speech community 1900-2000, history of Danish linguistics and its international background, didactics of Danish and the theory of the human sciences.


Best regards,

Lin Solvang
Course Administer
The LANCHART Centre
University of Copenhagen
Telephone +45
E-mail: lshum.ku.dk


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