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LINGUIST List 22.1302

Sat Mar 19 2011

Confs: Semantics/Germany

Editor for this issue: Di Wdzenczny <dilinguistlist.org>


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        1.     Jens Fleischhauer , Scalarity in Verb-Based Constructions

Message 1: Scalarity in Verb-Based Constructions
Date: 17-Mar-2011
From: Jens Fleischhauer <fleischhauerphil.uni-duesseldorf.de>
Subject: Scalarity in Verb-Based Constructions
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Scalarity in Verb-Based Constructions

Date: 07-Apr-2011 - 08-Apr-2011
Location: Duesseldorf, Germany
Contact: Jens Fleischhauer
Contact Email: fleischhauerphil.uni-duesseldorf.de
Meeting URL: http://www.phil-fak.uni-duesseldorf.de/fff/workshops/scalarity/

Linguistic Field(s): Semantics

Meeting Description:

The workshop 'Scalarity in Verb-Based Constructions' will take place April,
7./8. 2011 at the University of Duesseldorf, Germany. Traditionally, the
notions of scale and scalarity have been used as a key to the
understanding of phenomena related to gradable adjectives. In recent years
various approaches have been put forward which emphasize the role of
scalarity in verb meaning and verb-based constructions: Rappaport Hovav
(2008) and Rappaport Hovav & Levin (2010) analyze change of state verbs,
incremental theme verbs, and verbs of directed motion as expressing scalar
predications, which are related to different types of scales; Hay et al.
(1999), Kennedy & McNally (1999, 2005), Filip (2007), and Kennedy &
Levin (2008), among others, assume a relation between scale structure and
telicity; Beavers (2008) extends the scalar approach to the analysis of
durativity and punctuality of events. Moreover, scalarity is assumed to
constrain different types of verb-based constructions. In particular, there are
different accounts of the resultative construction that are directly based on
the notion of scalarity (e.g. Vanden Wyngaerd 2001, Wechsler 2005).

This workshop is intended as a forum for discussing empirical evidence for
the scalar viewpoint and its impact on formal semantic analysis. It addresses
the following questions:

-What is the significance of scalarity for the analysis of verbs?
-Which verbal phenomena can be analyzed in terms of scalarity?
-How is scalarity represented in verb semantics?

Some of the more specific questions related to these general questions are
the following:

- Are there precise criteria to distinguish scalar and non-scalar verbs and
verb-based constructions?
- How can scalarity be integrated in decompositional approaches to verb
meaning?
- What is the precise relation between gradability and scalarity? Are there
instances of scalarity without gradability?
- Which elements of the analysis of gradable adjectives can be transferred
to the analysis of verbs?
- How do degree and measure phrases interact with verbal semantics?
How can the analysis of degree and measure phrases be transferred from
the adjectival to the verbal domain?
- Is the scalar approach to the above-mentioned phenomena superior to
approaches which do not make use of scalarity?

Invited Speakers:

Hana Filip (University of Düsseldorf)
Louise McNally (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
Malka Rappaport Hovav (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Robert D. Van Valin, Jr. (University of Düsseldorf)

Workshop 'Scalarity in Verb-Based Constructions'
Workshop program

Thursday, 7. April 2011

09:00 - 09:30 Registration

09:30 - 10:10 Welcome and introduction

10:10 - 10:50 Yael Greenberg (Bar Ilan University)
A measure function on eventualities: the case of verbal additive 'more'

11:10 - 11:50 Anna Howell (Universität Tübingen)
Exceed-type comparatives in English and cross-linguistically

11:50 - 12:30 Daniel Lassiter (New York University and University of
London)
Bouletic and deontic modals are non-monotonic and scalar

13:45 - 14:45 Louise McNally (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
Reflections on absolute standards, the notion of completeness, and telicity

15:00 - 15:40 Patricia Amaral (University of Liverpool)
A diagnostic for scalar verbs

15:40 - 16:20 Luciana Sanchez-Mendes (Universidade de São Paulo)
Scalar properties of degree modification on verbal domain: evidence from
Karitiana

16:20 - 17:00 Carla Umbach (Universität Osnabrück)
Intensifiers and measure phrases combined with verbs

17:15 - 18:15 Sebastian Löbner (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf)
The gradation of verbs and subcompositionality

Friday, 8. April 2011

09:30 - 10:30 Malka Rappaport Hovav (The Hebrew University of
Jerusalem)
Lexicalized scales, scalar change and 'lexical aspect'

10:50 - 11:30 Kristen Johannes (Johns Hopkins University)
The role of scales in directional PPs and motion events

11:30 - 12:10 Wilhelm Geuder (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf)
Manner-result complementarity and movement verbs

12:20 - 13:00 James Pustejovsky (Brandeis University) and Elisabetta Jezek
(Università di Pavia)
Scale shifting and compositionality

14:15 - 15:15 Robert D. Van Valin, Jr. (Heinrich-Heine-Universität
Düsseldorf)
t.b.a.

15:30 - 16:10 Zsofia Gyarmathy (ELTE-MTA Theoretical Linguistics
Programme, Hungary University)
The role of granularity in the semantics of achievements in the progressive

16:10 - 16:50 Barbara Sonnenhauser (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
München)
Bavarian 'der-' as subject-related scalar prefix

16:50 - 17:30 Olga Kagan (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)
On the scalar nature of verbal prefixes in Slavic

17:45 - 18:45 Hana Filip (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf)
Sums and scales

18:45 - 19:00 Discussion and closing

For more information have a look on the workshop's webpage:
http://www.phil-fak.uni-duesseldorf.de/fff/workshops/scalarity-in-verb-based-
constructions/

Registration

If you want to participate at the workshop, since there is limited place for
attendees, please send an email to register. Please let us know your name,
affiliation, and contact e-mail address. There will be a workshop fee of 20?
(10? for students).



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This Year the LINGUIST List hopes to raise $67,000. This money will go to help 
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You can donate right now using our secure credit card form at  
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Alternatively you can also pledge right now and pay later. To do so, go to: 
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For all information on donating and pledging, including information on how to 
donate by check, money order, or wire transfer, please visit: 
http://linguistlist.org/donation/

The LINGUIST List is under the umbrella of Eastern Michigan University and as 
such can receive donations through the EMU Foundation, which is a registered 
501(c) Non Profit organization. Our Federal Tax number is 38-6005986. These 
donations can be offset against your federal and sometimes your state tax return 
(U.S. tax payers only). For more information visit the IRS Web-Site, or contact 
your financial advisor.

Many companies also offer a gift matching program, such that they will match 
any gift you make to a non-profit organization. Normally this entails your 
contacting your human resources department and sending us a form that the 
EMU Foundation fills in and returns to your employer. This is generally a simple 
administrative procedure that doubles the value of your gift to LINGUIST, without 
costing you an extra penny. Please take a moment to check if your company 
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Thank you very much for your support of LINGUIST!

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