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LINGUIST List 22.1588

Fri Apr 08 2011

Confs: Semantics/USA

Editor for this issue: Di Wdzenczny <dilinguistlist.org>


LINGUIST is pleased to announce the launch of an exciting new feature: Easy Abstracts! Easy Abs is a free abstract submission and review facility designed to help conference organizers and reviewers accept and process abstracts online. Just go to: http://www.linguistlist.org/confcustom, and begin your conference customization process today! With Easy Abstracts, submission and review will be as easy as 1-2-3!
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        1.     Veneeta Dayal , Semantics and Linguistic Theory 21

Message 1: Semantics and Linguistic Theory 21
Date: 06-Apr-2011
From: Veneeta Dayal <dayalrci.rutgers.edu>
Subject: Semantics and Linguistic Theory 21
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Semantics and Linguistic Theory 21
Short Title: SALT 21

Date: 20-May-2011 - 22-May-2011
Location: New Brunswick, NJ, USA
Contact: Veneeta Dayal
Contact Email: salt2011gmail.com
Meeting URL: http://salt.rutgers.edu/

Linguistic Field(s): Semantics

Meeting Description:

Semantics and Linguistic Theory (SALT) is the major North-American
conference on formal semantics as a subfield of linguistics. The SALT 21
will take place May 20-May 22, 2011 at Rutgers University, New Brunswick
NJ.

Invited Speakers:

Chris Kennedy, University of Chicago
Angelika Kratzer, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Mandy Simons, Carnegie Mellon University
Jesse Snedeker, Harvard University

To register for SALT21 go to: http://salt.rutgers.edu/Registration
The registration fee before April 26 is $50 for Student/Unemployed, $90 for
Employed; before May 16 it is $75 for Student/Unemployed, $115 for
Employed. On-site registration is $90 for Student/Unemployed, $140 for
Employed.


Friday May 20
8:15-9:15: Registration/Coffee/Opening remarks
9:15-10:15: INVITED TALK: What can can mean
Angelika Kratzer (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

10:15-10:55: Indefinites in comparatives
Maria Aloni and Floris Roelofsen (ILCC, University of Amsterdam)

10:55-11:10: Coffee
11:10-11:50: Evidentiality and Temporal Distance Learning
Todor Koev (Rutgers University)

11:50-12:30: Quantification and Context in Measure Adverbials
Ashwini Deo and Maria Mercedes Pinango (Yale University)

12:30-1:10: The Presuppositions of Soft Triggers are not Presuppositions
Jacopo Romoli (Harvard University)

1:10-3:00: Lunch

3:00-3:40: The Problem of Counterfactual de re Attitudes
Igor Yanovich (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

3:40-4:20: Fastidious Distributivity
Jakub Dotla?il (University of Groningen)

4:20-4:35: Coffee

4:35-5:15: Generalised Quantifiers and the Semantics of the same
Richard Zuber (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

5:15-6:15: INVITED TALK: Dynamic Pragmatics, or, Why we shouldn't be
Afraid of Embedded Implicatures
Mandy Simons (Carnegie Mellon University)

Saturday, May 21
8:45-9:00:Registration/Coffee
9:00-10:00: INVITED TALK: A neo-Fregean Semantics for Number Words
Chris Kennedy (University of Chicago)

10:00-10:40: An Experimental Investigation of Presupposition Projection in
Conditional Sentences
Jacopo Romoli, Yasutada Sudo and Jesse Snedeker (Harvard University,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

10:40-11:00: Coffee

11:00-11:40: Towards a More Fine-Grained Theory of Temporal Adverbials
Daniel Altshuler (Hampshire College)

11:40-12:20: Absolute vs. Relative Adjectives - Variance Within vs. Between
Individuals
Assaf Toledo and Galit W. Sassoon (Utrecht University /ILLC, Univ. of
Amsterdam)

12:20-1:00: Pluractional Distributivity and Dependence
Robert Henderson (University of California, Santa Cruz)

1:00-2:30: Lunch
2:30-3:10: Presuppositions and Antipresuppositions in Conditionals
Brian Leahy (University of Konstanz)

3:10-3:50: Another and the Meaning of Measure Phrases
Guillaume Thomas (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

4:30-6:30: Poster Session/Reception
7:00-12:00: Dinner/Party

Sunday, May 22
9:45-10:00: Coffee
10:00-11:00: INVITED TALK: Cascading water, implicit naming and
instantaneous implicature: Experimental semantics/pragmatics in the post-
modular era
Jesse Snedeker (Harvard University)

11:00-11:40: Nouwen's Puzzle and a Scalar Semantics for Obligations,
Needs, and Requirements
Daniel Lassiter (New York University)

11:40-12:20: Implicit Complements, Paychecks and Variable-Free
Semantics
Walter Pedersen (McGill University)

12:20-12:50: Coffee
12:50-1:30 On the roads to de se
Emar Maier (University of Groningen)

1:30-2:10: Processing Degree Operator Movement: Implications for
Semantics of Differentials
Micha Y. Breakstone, Alexandre Cremers, Danny Fox and Martin Hackl
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Hebrew University, Sigma-École
Normale Supérieure)

Alternates
Constraints on Predication
Peter Graff & Jeremy Hartman (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

A recursive phonology interface for WH-F Alternative semantics
Mats Rooth & Hongyuan Dong (Cornell University/George Washington
University)

A Uniform Analysis for Concessive ''at least'' and Optative ''at least''
Patrick Grosz (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Poster Session, Saturday, May 21 (4.30pm-6.30pm)

Luis Alonso-Ovalle & Paula Menendez-Benito (University of Massachusetts,
Boston/University of Goettingen)
Two Types of Epistemic Indefinites: Private Ignorance vs. Public Indifference

Pranav Anand, Caroline Andrews, Donka Farkas, Kevin Reschke & Matthew
Wagers (University of California, Santa Cruz)
Quantification-¬triggered Inclusivization in Plural Interpretation

Corien Bary & Dag Haug (Radbound-Nijmegen/University of Oslo)
Inter- and intrasentential anaphora: the case of the Ancient Greek participle

Maria Biezma (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
Conditional inversion and givenness

Elena Castroviejo (University of Chicago)
'So' as a weak degree modifier

Liz Coppock & David Beaver (Lund University/University of Texas, Austin)
Sole Sisters

Luka Crni? (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Evaluativity and Polarity

Ilaria Frana & Kyle Rawlins (University of Goettingen / Johns Hopkins
University)
Unconditional concealed questions and the nature of Heim's ambiguity

Michael Gagnon & Alexis Wellwood (University of Maryland)
Distributivity and modality: where 'each' may go, 'every' can't follow

Peter Graff & Jeremy Hartman (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Constraints on Predication

Thomas Grano (University of Chicago)
Mental action and event structure in the semantics of 'try'

Vincent Homer (University of California, Los Angeles/École Normale
Supérieure)
On the Dependent Character of Licensing

Gianina Iordachioaia & Elena Soare (Stuttgart University/University of Paris
8) A further insight into the syntax-semantics of pluractionality

Yu Izumi (University of Maryland)
Interpreting Bare Nouns: Type-Shifting vs. Silent Heads

Ezra Keshet (University of Michigan)
Contrastive Focus and Paycheck Pronouns

Hadas Kotek, Yasutada Sudo, Edwin Howard & Martin Hackl
(Massachusetts
Institute of Technology)
Is Most More Than Half?

Takeo Kurafuji (Ritsumeikan University)
Japanese comparatives are semantically conjuncts: a dynamic view

Dave Kush (University of Maryland)
Height-Relative Determination of (Non-root) Modal Flavor: Evidence from
Hindi

Chungmin Lee & Myounghyoun Song (Seoul National University)
CF-Reduplication: Dynamic Prototypes and Contrastive Focus Effects

Terje Lohndal (University of Maryland)
The addicities of thematic separation

Qiong-peng Luo & Stephen Crain (Macquarie University)
Uniqueness and Co-variation in Chinese Wh-conditionals

Ai Matsui (Michigan State University)
On the Licensing of Understating NPIs

Lilia Rissman (Johns Hopkins University)
Instrumental 'with' and 'use:' a unified modal analysis

Anastasia Smirnova (Ohio State University)
Inferences about the future and gaps in evidential paradigms in Balkan
languages

Sandhya Sundaresan (University of Tromsoe - CASTL)
A plea for syntax: monsters, agreement and de se



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The LINGUIST List is under the umbrella of Eastern Michigan University and as 
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Many companies also offer a gift matching program, such that they will match 
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