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LINGUIST List 22.2933

Mon Jul 18 2011

Diss: Pragmatics/Syntax: Berry: 'Diachronic Adverbial Morphosyntax ...'

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        1.     James Berry , Diachronic Adverbial Morphosyntax: A minimalist study of lexicalization and grammaticalization

Message 1: Diachronic Adverbial Morphosyntax: A minimalist study of lexicalization and grammaticalization
Date: 18-Jul-2011
From: James Berry <James.Berryasu.edu>
Subject: Diachronic Adverbial Morphosyntax: A minimalist study of lexicalization and grammaticalization
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Institution: Arizona State University
Program: Interdisciplinary Committee on Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2011

Author: James A. Berry

Dissertation Title: Diachronic Adverbial Morphosyntax: A minimalist study of lexicalization and grammaticalization

Linguistic Field(s): Pragmatics
                            Syntax

Subject Language(s): Chinese, Mandarin (cmn)
                            English (eng)

Dissertation Director:
Elly van Gelderen

Dissertation Abstract:

The historical study of sentence adverbs has, before now, been based mostly
on models that emphasize the pragmatic and discourse-based motivations of
processes of grammaticalization. This dissertation breaks from such
tradition by exploring adverb development through syntactic and
morphological lenses. A generative, feature-based approach is used that
incorporates the cartographic architecture developed by Cinque and combines
it with a more phenomenological approach to both grammaticalization and
lexicalization.

Cinque's hierarchy of speech-act, evaluative, evidential, and epistemic
adverbs are analyzed. It is determined (through corpus data) that these
subcategories have grown in use primarily during the Modern English era,
and particularly during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These four
subcategories can be divided into two groups that are more general:
speech-act adverbs, which arise from a (conditional) speech clause that
undergoes ellipsis, and the other three types, which all arise from copula
clauses. Each of these two groups is considered, and different methods of
reanalysis by speakers are proposed for each.

In addition, a revised model for categorizing adverbs is proposed. This
model is based on morphological lexicalization (or univerbation) processes,
thus accounting for the wide variety of adverbial source materials. Such
lexicalization offers a pattern for sentence adverbial formation. Finally,
Standard Chinese adverbials are briefly examined, with the result that they
show very similar signs of lexicalization (within the limits of the writing
system).




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