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LINGUIST List 22.3100

Wed Aug 03 2011

Confs: Sociolinguistics/Spain

Editor for this issue: Zac Smith <zaclinguistlist.org>


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        1.     Vanessa Bretxa , Language Policy in Higher Education Workshop

Message 1: Language Policy in Higher Education Workshop
Date: 03-Aug-2011
From: Vanessa Bretxa <vanessa.bretxaub.edu>
Subject: Language Policy in Higher Education Workshop
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Language Policy in Higher Education Workshop
Short Title: MSLC2011


Date: 28-Oct-2011 - 28-Oct-2011
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Contact: Vanessa Bretxa
Contact Email: < click here to access email >
Meeting URL: http://www.ub.edu/cusc/llenguesmitjanes/?lang=en

Linguistic Field(s): Sociolinguistics

Meeting Description:

Research into medium-sized language communities has revealed that higher education (teaching and research therein) is one of the areas of society most susceptible to processes of linguistic homogenization and in which medium-sized languages come under the greatest pressure. In the communities studied so far there is evidence of a clear contradiction between the presence of native languages and the growing pressure exerted by preferred lingua francas, in particular English, which – albeit at different rates in each context – grows each day as the international academic lingua franca.

Similarly, the reorganization of language use in academic settings is by no means uniform, and the policies adopted are numerous and highly diverse, from university systems in which English is barely used as a teaching language to systems which adopt it to a far greater degree and even systems that use a different international lingua franca. The aim of this workshop is not just compare the situations and the glottopolitical processes of different medium-sized languages in higher education settings, but to consider the linguistic, social, political and economic factors that condition the processes in each case. The workshop will explore the following issues:

- Language use at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.
- The position of medium-sized languages in university research.
- Policies on linguistic requirements for native languages and lingua francas.
- The motives behind the design of language policies.

9h
Welcome

9.30h
Introduction. F. Xavier Vila and the Vice-Rector for Students and Language Policy

10h
The position of Catalan and other languages at Catalan universities -
Eva Pons, University of Barcelona

11h
The position of Danish and other languages at Danish universities -
Hartmut Haberland and Bent Preisler, University of Copenhagen

12h
Coffee break

12.30h
The position of Finnish and other languages at Finnish universities -
Sabine Ylönen, University of Jyväskylä

13.30h
The position of medium-sized language communities in South Africa - Anne-Marie Beukes, University of Johannesburg

14.30h
Lunch

16h
The position of Hebrew and other languages at Israeli universities - Ram
Drorit, Levinsky College of Education

17h
The position of Swedish and other languages at Swedish universities -
(pending confirmation)

18h
Roundtable with all conference presenters.
Moderator: F. Xavier Vila



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