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LINGUIST List 22.4055

Mon Oct 17 2011

Confs: Syntax/Norway

Editor for this issue: Amy Brunett <brunettlinguistlist.org>


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        1.     Christine Meklenborg Salvesen , Challenging Clitics


Message 1: Challenging Clitics
Date: 17-Oct-2011
From: Christine Meklenborg Salvesen <c.m.salvesenilos.uio.no>
Subject: Challenging Clitics
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Challenging Clitics

Date: 27-Oct-2011 - 28-Oct-2011
Location: Oslo, Norway
Contact: Christine Meklenborg Salvesen
Contact Email: clitics-workshopilos.uio.no
Meeting URL: http://www.hf.uio.no/ilos/forskning/aktuelt/arrangementer/konferanser-seminarer/2011/challenging-clitics/index.html

Linguistic Field(s): Syntax

Meeting Description:

The publication of Richard Kayne's 1975 monograph on French syntax initiated a lot of research on French but also on more general theoretical issues. The book defines five tests of clitichood: a clitic may never be modified, stressed, separated from its host, and lastly, clitic clusters always have a fixed word order. Over the years clitics have come to play a central role in linguistics. Within diachronic syntax, for example, clitics are thought to represent an intermediary stage between a full lexical item and an inflexional affix. There is however evidence that Kayne's tests of clitichood should be challenged. In African French, clitics may be stressed, and in the history of Italian, the internal position of clitics has changed. It is also necessary to modify the basically Romance conception of clitics: Clitics in the Germanic languages are not primarily pronouns, and their host is not necessarily a verb. These facts raise some questions: What kind of words may cliticise? What kind of word may clitics cliticise to? Is there cross-linguistic evidence that suggests a different way of defining clitics than the five tests provided by Kayne?

The workshop aims at looking at clitics from different angles, both with regards to the languages under study and the theoretical framework in use.

Invited Speakers:

Ur Shlonsky, University of Geneva
Helge Lødrup, University of Oslo
Mila D. Vulchanova, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Thursday October 27th

09.00-09.15
Coffee

09.15-09.20
Welcome

09.20-10.10
Mila Vulchanova: The Evolution of the Article in Old Bulgarian

10.10-10.40
Grete Dalmi: Polarity Question Clitics in South Slavic vs. Hungarian: a Cartographic Approach

10.40-11.10
Krzysztof Migdalski: Diachronic Source of Two Cliticization Patterns in Slavic

1110-1130
Coffee

11.30-12.00
Tabea Ihsane: One Clitic, Several 'sources'

12.00-12.30
Elizaveta Khachaturyan: The Acquisition of Italian and Russian Clitics by a Bilingual Child

12.30-13.45
Lunch

13.45-14.15
Alexandra Simonenko: Clitic-hood as a Phonological Correlate of Phase-head status: Evidence from Mainland Scandinavian DP

14.15-15.05
Helge Lødrup: Norwegian Possessive Pronouns: Phrases, Words or Suffixes?

15.05-15.20
Coffee

15.20-15.50
Cheikh Bamba Dione: Handling Wolof Clitics in LFG

15.50-16.20
Natalia Pavlou & Phoevos Panagiotidis: The Morhosyntax of -nde and Post-verbal Clitics in Cypriot Greek

16.20-16.50
Alexandra Galani & George Tsoulas: Doubling the Double Object Clitic Cluster: a Northwestern Greek Dialect

20.00
Dinner

Friday October 28th

09.00-09.30
Diego Pescarini: The Evolution of Italo-Romance Clitic Clusters

09.30-10.00
Cinzia Russi & Janice Aski: On the Variable Order of Double Object Clitic Clusters in 14th Century Tuscan Varieties

10.00-10.20
coffee

10.20-11.10
Ur Shlonsky: Feature Incorporation and Criterial Freezing: Subject Clitics in Northern Italian Dialects

11.10-11.40
Francisco Jose Fernandez Rubiera: Revisiting Enclisis and Proclisis Alternations: Matrix and Embedded Clauses in Asturian

11.40-12.10
Filomena Sandalo & Charlotte Galves: Clitic Placement and Grammaticalization in Portuguese

12.10-13.15
lunch

13.15-13.45
Marios Mavrogiorgos: V-movement to a V-related head and Enclisis in Finiteness-sensitive and Tobler-Mussafia Languages: a View from PF/morphology

13.45-14.15
Francine A. Girard: To What Extent are Clitics in Cajun French a Challenge for Traditional Analysis?

14.15-14.45
Mohamed Jlassi: On the Existence of Subject Clitics in Arabic: Evidence from Particle Clitics in Tunisian Arabic

14.45-15.00
Closing remarks

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