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LINGUIST List 22.4086

Wed Oct 19 2011

Diss: Lang Documentation/Morphology/Phonology: Marlo: 'The Verbal ...'

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        1.     Michael Marlo , The Verbal Tonology of Lumarachi and Lunyala-West: Two dialects of Luluyia (Bantu, J.30, Kenya)


Message 1: The Verbal Tonology of Lumarachi and Lunyala-West: Two dialects of Luluyia (Bantu, J.30, Kenya)
Date: 17-Oct-2011
From: Michael Marlo <marlommissouri.edu>
Subject: The Verbal Tonology of Lumarachi and Lunyala-West: Two dialects of Luluyia (Bantu, J.30, Kenya)
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Institution: University of Michigan
Program: Department of Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2007

Author: Michael R. Marlo

Dissertation Title: The Verbal Tonology of Lumarachi and Lunyala-West: Two dialects of Luluyia (Bantu, J.30, Kenya)

Linguistic Field(s): Language Documentation
                            Morphology
                            Phonology

Subject Language(s): Oluluyia (luy)
Language Family(ies): Central Narrow Bantu J
                            Narrow Bantu

Dissertation Director:
Andries W. Coetzee
David Odden

Dissertation Abstract:

This dissertation is a study of the verbal tone patterns of Lumarachi and
Lunyala—two previously undescribed dialects of Luluyia, a Bantu language of
western Kenya and eastern Uganda. On the basis of original data collected
by the author primarily in the field, it describes and analyzes the many
tonal alternations that are triggered in each dialect by tense-aspect
distinctions, as well as the tonal alternations that are triggered by one
or two object prefixes, by the lexical distinction between /H/ and /Ø/
roots (in Lumarachi), by the presence of the causative and passive
suffixes, and by the presence of a word following the verb. It therefore
documents the rich interaction at the phonology-morphology interface
between principles governing the realization of tone in these two dialects,
while providing fundamental linguistic description of two undescribed
dialects of a underdescribed language and contributing generally to the
study of Bantu tonology and phonology.




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