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LINGUIST List 22.4563

Tue Nov 15 2011

Diss: Translation/German: Becher: 'Explicitation and Implicitation ...'

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        1.     Viktor Becher , Explicitation and Implicitation in Translation: A corpus-based study of English-German and German-English translations of business texts


Message 1: Explicitation and Implicitation in Translation: A corpus-based study of English-German and German-English translations of business texts
Date: 10-Nov-2011
From: Viktor Becher <viktor.becheruni-hamburg.de>
Subject: Explicitation and Implicitation in Translation: A corpus-based study of English-German and German-English translations of business texts
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Institution: University of Hamburg
Program: Applied Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2011

Author: Viktor Becher

Dissertation Title: Explicitation and Implicitation in Translation: A corpus-based study of English-German and German-English translations of business texts

Dissertation URL: http://ediss.sub.uni-hamburg.de/volltexte/2011/5321/

Linguistic Field(s): Translation

Subject Language(s): English (eng)
                            German (deu)

Dissertation Director:
Kristin B├╝hrig
Juliane House

Dissertation Abstract:

The thesis presents a study of explicitation and implicitation in
translation. Explicitating and implicitating shifts were manually
identified in a corpus of English and German business texts and their
translations in both directions. Shifts were classified according to formal
and functional criteria. The study departed from the observation that
explicitations in one translation direction are often not 'counterbalanced'
by implicitations in the other direction (cf. Klaudy's Asymmetry
Hypothesis). The main aim of the study was to specify the conditions under
which this state of 'explicitational asymmetry' can be observed. Unlike
most other studies of explicitation in translation, the present study did
not depart from the assumption of a 'translation-inherent', universal
process of explicitation (cf. Blum-Kulka's Explicitation Hypothesis).
Rather, the prediction underlying the study was that every instance of
explicitation (and implicitation) can be explained as a result of
lexicogrammatical and/or pragmatic factors. This prediction was essentially
confirmed by the study's findings. Thorough qualitative analysis has made
it possible to compile a list of factors that regularly lead translators to
explicitate or implicitate. The factors explain why implicitations are
often outnumbered by the corresponding explicitations.




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