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LINGUIST List 22.4747

Tue Nov 29 2011

Calls: Melanesian Languages, General Ling, Lang Documentation/Australia

Editor for this issue: Alison Zaharee <alisonlinguistlist.org>


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        1.     Fanny Cottet , Languages of Melanesia


Message 1: Languages of Melanesia
Date: 28-Nov-2011
From: Fanny Cottet <fanny_cottethotmail.com>
Subject: Languages of Melanesia
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Full Title: Languages of Melanesia

Date: 16-Mar-2012 - 18-Mar-2012
Location: Kioloa, NSW, Australia
Contact Person: Fanny Cottet
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://chl.anu.edu.au/linguistics/melanesia/

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics; Language Documentation

Other Specialty: Melanesian Languages

Call Deadline: 15-Jan-2012

Meeting Description:

The workshop on the Languages of Melanesia is organized by the department of Linguistics at the Australian National University (School of Culture, History and Language) and will be held at the Kioloa campus of ANU (NSW coast) on the 16-18 March 2012.

Melanesia is the most linguistically diverse part of the world with more than 1200 languages spoken on the island of New Guinea alone (Foley 2000). Despite this diversity, it makes sense to isolate Melanesia as a unit for analysis owing to the many cross-cutting directions of influence between the languages of the region. For this reason we welcome papers both on Papuan languages proper, and on Austronesian languages of the Melanesian region. Although studies on languages spoken in Melanesia have been on the increase, the linguistic area remains under-described. Following on the three previous workshops on Papuan languages organised in 2006 and 2008 (University of Sydney) and 2010 (ANU), this workshop aims at gathering in 2012, linguists from various generations to foster a sense of community between scholars working in the area. It will be deliberately informal, focusing on daring and exploratory work rather than published outcomes.

During the weekend, presentations and discussions will alternate with chances to swim in the Pacific and relaxed bushwalking.

Cost will be kept to a minimum (approx. AUD 200 including accommodation and food) and transport will be arranged from Canberra on the morning of the 16 March and back to Canberra on the afternoon of the 18 March.

Call for Papers:

Prospective participants are invited to submit abstracts related to any aspect of the languages spoken in Melanesia. Talks will be from 20 to 40 minutes long (presenter's preference has to be specified in the abstract) followed by a 10 minutes discussion. Abstracts should not be longer than 200 words including examples and bibliography and should be submitted before 15 January 2012 to Fanny Cottet (fanny.cottetanu.edu.au).

You may include any topic pertaining to Melanesian languages, including but not restricted to:

- Synchronic description of particular languages
- Sociolinguistic issues
- Diachronic perspectives, language reconstruction and comparative linguistic
- Interactions between Papuan and Austronesian languages
- Methodology of fieldwork
- Language documentation and issues of language endangerment
- Language and revitalization
- Language and education
- Typological issues



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