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LINGUIST List 22.4761

Tue Nov 29 2011

Diss: Historical Ling/Socioling: Fens-de Zeeuw: 'Lindley Murray ...'

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        1.     Lyda Fens-de Zeeuw , Lindley Murray (1745-1826), Quaker and Grammarian


Message 1: Lindley Murray (1745-1826), Quaker and Grammarian
Date: 28-Nov-2011
From: Lyda Fens-de Zeeuw <lyda.fens.dezeeuwutoronto.ca>
Subject: Lindley Murray (1745-1826), Quaker and Grammarian
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Institution: Leiden University Centre for Linguistics
Program: Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2011

Author: Lyda Fens-de Zeeuw

Dissertation Title: Lindley Murray (1745-1826), Quaker and Grammarian

Dissertation URL: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/17835

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
Sociolinguistics

Subject Language(s): English (eng)


Dissertation Director(s):
Ingrid Tieken-Boon van Ostade

Dissertation Abstract:

The American-born Quaker Lindley Murray (1745-1826) arguably was the most influential English language grammarian; undeniably he was the best-selling one. Murray was the author of the English Grammar (1795), and between 1795 and the middle of the nineteenth century millions of copies were sold of this grammar alone, while several of his other textbooks were no less popular. In my dissertation, I paint a comprehensive portrait of this prolific writer, and I investigate how Murray's Quakerism influenced his language use, by analysing a corpus of 262 of his unpublished private letters. In addition, I compared his own usage to the rules that he compiled for his English Grammar, to see whether Murray practiced what he preached.

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