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LINGUIST List 23.4270

Fri Oct 12 2012

Calls: Syntax, Semantics, Typology, Psycholing, Neuroling/Poland

Editor for this issue: Alison Zaharee <alisonlinguistlist.org>

Date: 12-Oct-2012
From: Joanna Blaszczak <joanna.blaszczakgooglemail.com>
Subject: How Categorical are Categories?
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Full Title: How Categorical are Categories?
Short Title: TRAIT

Date: 07-Jan-2013 - 09-Jan-2013
Location: Wrocław, Poland
Contact Person: Joanna Blaszczak
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.ifa.uni.wroc.pl/linguistics/traitworkshop.html

Linguistic Field(s): Neurolinguistics; Psycholinguistics; Semantics; Syntax; Typology

Call Deadline: 15-Nov-2012

Meeting Description:

The Research Group TRAIT working at the Center for General and Comparative Linguistics at the University of Wroclaw in Poland (http://www.ifa.uni.wroc.pl/linguistics/) (http://www.ifa.uni.wroc.pl/trait/) is pleased to announce that the international workshop 'How Categorical are Categories?' will be held at the University of Wroclaw in January 2013.

Leitmotiv:

How categorical are the traditional distinctions between grammatical categories and how categorical is their semantics? New theoretical and experimental approaches to old problems

General Issue:

The workshop is intended to bring together formal and experimental linguists and thus provide a forum for discussion about the nature of linguistic diversity in syntax and semantics of various grammatical categories, with special focus on Tense, Aspect and Modality.

Dates: 7-9 January 2013
Location: Wrocław (University of Wrocław, Institute of English Studies)

Invited Speakers:

Mark C. Baker (Rutgers University)
Oliver Bott (University of Tübingen)
Bridget Copley (CNRS and Université Paris 8)
Anastasia Giannakidou (University of Chicago)
Valentine Hacquard (University of Maryland)
Martin Haspelmath (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig)
Manfred Krifka (ZAS and Humboldt-University of Berlin)
Roumyana Pancheva (University of Southern California)
Henriëtte de Swart (Utrecht University)
Martina Wiltschko (University of British Columbia)
Malte Zimmermann (University of Potsdam)

Sponsored by the Institute of English Studies of the University of Wroclaw and the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP)

Registration Fee:

Faculty: 120 EUR
Students: 60 EUR

The fee covers the conference dinner as well as snacks and refreshments during coffee breaks.

Accommodation:

Please see http://www.ifa.uni.wroc.pl/linguistics/traitworkshop.html for details.

Preliminary Registration (Important!):

If you are (tentatively) interested in taking part in this conference, send your email address to joanna.blaszczakgooglemail.com, so that we can create a mailing list. Most future announcements, changes, etc., will be mailed only to registered prospective participants (and not to general linguistic lists). Apart from that all the updates about the conference will be posted on the conference website.

Contact Email Address:

If you have any questions, please send an email to the following address:

joanna.blaszczakgooglemail.com

2nd Call for Papers:

Specific Thematic Panels:

Panel 1: Cross-linguistic variation in the syntax and semantics of Tense / Aspect / Modality and universal patterns of their interaction

More specific questions:

- How much freedom is there in the semantic and syntactic variation of Tense, Aspect and Modality?
- What are the parameters along which such variation is organized?
- Can any universal patterns of the interaction between Tense, Aspect and Modality (e.g., in the actuality entailment) be observed?

Invited Talks:

Valentine Hacquard (University of Maryland)
Malte Zimmermann (University of Potsdam)
Two slots for additional submissions

Panel 2: What is future?

More specific questions:

- Is future a separate category (e.g., a modal or a temporal category) or is it a combination of other categories (e.g., tense and aspect)?
- Why do we observe so much diversity in the expression and interpretation of future cross-linguistically?
- Can any robust universal generalizations with respect to futurity be made in spite of this diversity?

Invited Talks:

Bridget Copley (CNRS and Université Paris 8)
Anastasia Giannakidou (University of Chicago)
Two slots for additional submissions

Panel 3: What is subjunctive?

More specific questions:

- Is subjunctive a separate category (e.g. a modal or a temporal category) or is it a combination of other categories?
- What defines subjunctive? (Is it its special morphology or semantics or is it its dependence on the matrix clause, etc.?)
- Why do we observe so much diversity in the expression and interpretation of subjunctive mood cross-linguistically?
- Can any robust universal generalizations with respect to subjunctive be made in spite of this diversity?

Invited Talks:

Anastasia Giannakidou (University of Chicago)
Martina Wiltschko (University of British Columbia)
Two slots for additional submissions

Panel 4: How compositional is the composition of temporal meaning?

More specific questions:

- How can the problem of aspectual coercion be accounted for?
- Should coercion be treated uniformly or should we rather assume different types of coercion?
- What can psycholinguistic experiments contribute to this problem?
- Are psycholinguistic results compatible with a strictly compositional view?

Invited Talks:

Henriëtte de Swart (Utrecht University)
Oliver Bott (University of Tübingen)
Manfred Krifka (ZAS and Humboldt-University of Berlin)
Two slots for additional submissions

Panel 5: How can cartographic, feature-based, scalar and experimental approaches contribute to our better understating of categories?

More specific questions:

- How categorical are the traditional categories? - Discreteness vs. scalarity
- What is the definition of finiteness? (especially in the connection with subjunctive)
- What can neurolinguistics (e.g., neuroimaging, research on aphasia) contribute to our understanding of cartography/strict hierarchy of functional projections?
- How categorical is the part-of-speech distinction?
- Are there any new experimental results relating to the above questions?

Invited Talks:

Roumyana Pancheva (University of Southern California)
Martin Haspelmath (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig)
Mark C. Baker (Rutgers University)
Two slots for additional submissions

We invite papers and posters relating to one of the thematic panels or, more generally, to one of the following issues:

(i) If the relevant categories are discrete (e.g. cf. Baker (2003)) what definitional properties should they be associated with, how should definitional properties be modified in view of the growing empirical domain (e.g., polysynthesis as the relevant diagnostic for verb vs. noun distinction)?
(ii) If the categories are not discrete, should they (i) be subsumed under broader discrete categories (e.g., Tense and Aspect as two instantiations of one category related to temporal anchoring of events); or (ii) interpreted as epiphenomenal (i.e., consisting of a number of primitive nano-features? The latter view is especially popular in the recent nanosyntactic approach (cf. Starke (2009)) relying on cartography or in the semantic map approach in the functional literature (cf. Haspelmath 2000).
(iii) If the categories are not discrete and epiphenomenal, what theoretical model is most adequate and restrictive to capture the empirical data?
(iv) Can experimental psycholinguistic work provide evidence of the categorical kind (e.g., involvement of a specific cortical region and lack thereof for a category X and Y respectively) or only gradual kind (e.g., modulation of a given ERP component)?
(v) In what way can comparative experimental work contribute to our understanding of different categories (e.g., processing of Person inflected verbs in language X vs. Y, or processing of Future in language X vs. Y)?

The format of the conference is:

- 45 min for presentation + 15 min question time for invited talks
- 30 min for presentation + 10 min question time for regular submissions

The language of the conference is English.

A selection of papers presented at the workshop will be published in a special thematic volume, presumably by the Oxford University Press.

Organizing Committee:

Joanna Błaszczak, University of Wroclaw
Dorota Klimek-Jankowska, University of Wroclaw
Krzysztof Migdalski, University of Wroclaw
Patrycja Jabłońska, University of Wroclaw

Dates:

Deadline for receipt of abstracts: 15 November 2012
Notification of acceptance: 30 November 2012
Meeting: 7-9 January 2013

Abstracts:

Abstract submission deadline: 15 November 2012

Submission Guidelines:

Abstracts should be sent in PDF format and submitted electronically to the following email address:

joanna.blaszczakgooglemail.com

They must be anonymous and consist of no more than two pages (margins: 2.5 cm or 1 inch, font size 12 points, single spacing), including references, figures and data. Data should be included in the main text of the abstract. An individual may submit at most one single and one co-authored abstract.

Please notice that for your submission to be completed you will need to indicate whether your abstract is to be considered for:

- Panel 1: 'Cross-linguistic variation in the syntax and semantics of Tense/Aspect/Modality and universal patterns of their interaction'
- Panel 2: 'What is future?'
- Panel 3: 'What is subjunctive?'
- Panel 4: 'How compositional is the composition of temporal meaning?'
- Panel 5: 'How can cartographic, feature-based, scalar and experimental approaches contribute to our better understanding of categories?'
- Poster Session

For more information, see:

http://www.ifa.uni.wroc.pl/linguistics/traitworkshop.html



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