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LINGUIST List 24.3558

Wed Sep 11 2013

Calls: Socioling, Psycholing, Lang Acq, Cognitive Science, Anthro Ling/Italy

Editor for this issue: Bryn Hauk <brynlinguistlist.org>

Date: 11-Sep-2013
From: Simona Marchesini <s.marchesiniprogettoalteritas.org>
Subject: Second and Third Generation: Integration and Identity on Children of Migrants
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Full Title: Second and Third Generation: Integration and Identity on Children of Migrants
Short Title: 2ndGEN

Date: 06-May-2014 - 06-May-2014
Location: Verona, Italy
Contact Person: Simona Marchesini
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.progettoalteritas.org

Linguistic Field(s): Anthropological Linguistics; Cognitive Science; Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics; Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 02-Oct-2013

Meeting Description:

Alteritas, a research institution devoted to the study of the interaction between people and space through history, is pleased to present a publication project dealing with second and third generation immigrants and mixed couples.

Children and grandchildren of immigrants or of mixed marriages can act as a cultural bridge between human groups: their degree of integration into the society they are living in - and often they are completely part of - may vary depending on several parameters (see also our conference ‘Mixed Marriages’ at http://www.progettoalteritas.org/alteritas_/eventi/00017907_Download.html). Geographical origin and nationality of parents, religion, language, propensity of a group to integrate into the new society, (individual and group) self-consciousness and education are elements that can promote or inhibit integration and cultural exchange within the adoptive community. New cultural settings often emerge in children and grandchildren of immigrants or of mixed couples while attending local schools and living far away from the region of origin.

However, a ‘return to roots’ could sometimes be observed among individuals who - for different reasons - cannot or do not want to identify themselves with the hosting culture. Within this framework, processes of cultural exchange and reciprocal knowledge can emerge: people born in multicultural familial landscapes can become cultural cross-overs even between very distant worlds.

Alteritas has a multidisciplinary and historically open approach in its research on the interaction among peoples, i.e. not fixed to narrow time periods. Alteritas is conscious that any human behaviour is characterised by repeating constants, our centre aims to study the underlying structure of ethnic and cultural contacts through history and tries to discover the key elements that lead to these anthropic phenomena.

The data analysis is aimed at focusing images and prejudices that people have of the Other and their changes through experience of cultural contact. The results are intended as a scientific, but at the same time, easily accessible tool that should be available for further critical discussion throughout society.

2nd Call for Papers:

The volume we propose here will therefore be made up of contributions that focus on the intercultural relations in the ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary world and at the same time provide up-to-date data that can be used for the interpretation of the current situation.

We welcome contributions from archaeologists, historians, sociologists, religious historians, linguists, demographers, anthropologists and scholars of other disciplines, that can help provide different views and enriching insights on the subject.

The volume will be presented with a panel discussion in Verona in Juni 2014.

Please send an abstract and a brief CV by 2 October 2013 to infoprogettoalteritas.org.



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