* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *


LINGUIST List 24.795

Wed Feb 13 2013

Calls: Computational Linguistics, Text/Corpus Linguistics/USA

Editor for this issue: Alison Zaharee <alisonlinguistlist.org>

Date: 12-Feb-2013
From: Alexandra Balahur <alexandra.balahurjrc.ec.europa.eu>
Subject: 4th Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity, Sentiment & Social Media Analysis
E-mail this message to a friend

Full Title: 4th Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity, Sentiment & Social Media Analysis
Short Title: WASSA 2013

Date: 14-Jun-2013 - 14-Jun-2013
Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Contact Person: Alexandra Balahur
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://optima.jrc.it/wassa2013/index.htm

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics

Call Deadline: 20-Mar-2013

Meeting Description:

Recent years have marked the beginning and expansion of the Social Web, in which people freely express and respond to opinion on a whole variety of topics. While the growing volume of subjective information available allows for better and more informed decisions of the users, the quantity of data to be analyzed imposed the development of specialized Natural Language Processing (NLP) systems that automatically detect subjectivity in text and subsequently extract, classify and summarize the opinions available on different topics. Although these research fields have been highly dynamic in the past years, dealing with subjectivity in text has proven to be a complex, interdisciplinary problem that remains far from being solved. Its challenges include the need to address the issue from different perspectives and at different levels, depending on the characteristics of the textual genre, the language(s) treated and the final application for which the analysis is done.

The aim of the 4th Workshop on Computational Approaches to Subjectivity, Sentiment and Social Media Analysis (WASSA 2013) is to continue the line of the previous three editions, bringing together researchers in Computational Linguistics working on Subjectivity and Sentiment Analysis and researchers working on interdisciplinary aspects of affect computation from text. Additionally, this year, we would like to extend the focus to Social Media phenomena and the impact of affect-related phenomena in this context.

Call for Papers:

We encourage the submission of long and short research and demo papers including, but not restricted to the following topics related to subjectivity, sentiment and social media analysis:

- Lexical semantic resources, corpora and annotations for subjectivity, sentiment and social media analysis; (semi-)automatic corpora generation and annotation
- Opinion retrieval, extraction, categorization, aggregation and summarization
- Trend detection in social media using subjectivity and sentiment analysis techniques
- Data linking through social networks based on affect-related NLP methods
- Impact of affective data from social media
- Mass opinion estimation based on NLP and statistical models
- Online reputation management
- Topic and sentiment studies and applications of topic-sentiment analysis
- Domain, topic and genre dependency of sentiment analysis
- Ambiguity issues and word sense disambiguation of subjective language
- Pragmatic analysis of the opinion mining task
- Use of Semantic Web technologies for subjectivity and sentiment analysis
- Improvement of NLP tasks using subjectivity and/or sentiment analysis
- Intrinsic and extrinsic evaluations subjectivity and sentiment analysis
- Subjectivity, sentiment and emotion detection in social networks
- Classification of stance in dialogues
- Applications of sentiment and social media analysis systems

We also encourage participants to provide demos of their systems, thus giving them the opportunity to obtain feedback on their achievements and issues. At the same time, with the help of demos, we aim at enriching the discussion forum with application-specific topics for debate.

Submissions:

At WASSA 2013, we will accept two types of submissions: long and short papers.

Long papers: Long papers may consist of up to eight (8) pages of content, with two (2) additional pages of references, and will be presented orally.

Short papers: Short papers may consist of up to five (5) pages of content, and two (2) additional pages of references. The following types of papers are appropriate for a short paper submission:

- A paper describing the demonstration of a system
- A small, focused contribution
- Work in progress
- A negative result
- An opinion piece
- An interesting application nugget

Short papers will be presented either orally or as a poster. The choice of presentation will be given not based on the quality of the submission, but on the PC's recommendation relating to the most suitable presentation method.

Papers for WASSA should be submitted using the NAACL-HLT 2013 Style Files, available at: http://naacl2013.naacl.org/Documents/naaclhlt2013.tgz.

Reviewing for WASSA 2013 will be blind: reviewers will not be presented with the identity of paper authors. Authors should avoid writing anything that makes their identity obvious in the text.

Submissions should be original, and in particular should not previously have been formally published.

Accepted papers will be published in the NAACL-HLT WASSA proceedings, with ISBN. The best papers will be chosen for a special issue of an ISI-indexed journal (to be confirmed). Past editions special issues include the Decision Support Systems journal (Elsevier) and Computer Speech and Language journal (Elsevier).

To submit a paper, please access: https://www.softconf.com/naacl2013/WASSA2013/.



Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue



Page Updated: 13-Feb-2013

Supported in part by the National Science Foundation       About LINGUIST    |   Contact Us       ILIT Logo
While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.