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LINGUIST List 24.838

Fri Feb 15 2013

Calls: General Linguistics/USA

Editor for this issue: Alison Zaharee <alisonlinguistlist.org>

Date: 14-Feb-2013
From: Chris Palmer <cpalme20kennesaw.edu>
Subject: Division on Language Change at the Modern Language Association Annual Convention
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Full Title: Division on Language Change at the Modern Language Association Annual Convention
Short Title: MLA

Date: 09-Jan-2014 - 12-Jan-2014
Location: Chicago, IL, USA
Contact Person: Allison Maliandi-Warheit
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.mla.org/convention

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 15-Mar-2013

Meeting Description:

Founded in 1883, the Modern Language Association of America provides opportunities for its members to share their scholarly findings and teaching experiences with colleagues and to discuss trends in the academy. MLA members host an annual convention and other meetings, work with related organizations, and sustain one of the finest publishing programs in the humanities. For over a hundred years, members have worked to strengthen the study and teaching of language and literature.

Call for Papers:

The Division on Language Change at the Modern Language Association is now accepting abstracts for panels at the 2014 Convention, to be held 9-12 January in Chicago. We are sponsoring two sessions:

Session #1: Diversity and Change

What role does ‘diversity’ play in understanding language change? Papers will explore perspectives on linguistic diversity, e.g. language maintenance, decline, and loss; language policy; and/or social variation. For consideration, submit a 250-word abstract by 15 March to Chris Palmer (Email: cpalme20 AT kennesaw.edu).

Session#2: Language Change and Literature

How does language change matter to literature (and vice versa)? How might change inform recent theoretical perspectives (e.g., historical, cognitive, digital, ethical, rhetorical, or descriptive approaches)? For consideration, submit a 250-word abstract by 15 March to Chris Palmer (Email: cpalme20 AT kennesaw.edu).



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