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LINGUIST List 25.1557

Wed Apr 02 2014

FYI: CeLM Reading UK, Lecture by Dr. Manne Bylund, April 7th

Editor for this issue: Uliana Kazagasheva <ulianalinguistlist.org>

Date: 02-Apr-2014
From: Jason Rothman <j.rothmanreading.ac.uk>
Subject: CeLM Reading UK, Lecture by Dr. Manne Bylund, April 7th
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The Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM) at the University of Reading (UK)(http://www.reading.ac.uk/celm/), invites all to the lecture by Dr. Manne Bylund of the University of Stockholm that will take place this coming Monday, April 7th (see details)

Differences in L2 ultimate attainment: age of acquisition effects or effects of bilingualism?
Dr. Manne Bylund
University of Stockholm

Location:
Whiteknights Campus
Room: Psychology Building GS05
Time: 4-5:30

Abstract:
A robust finding in the field of L2 acquisition is the different rates of success with which children and adults achieve nativelike proficiency in a L2. These differences have traditionally been explained in terms of the maturational state of the learner. Recently, however, a growing number of accounts hold that age effects in ultimate attainment are due to the fact that L2 speakers are bilingual (e.g. Flege 1999; MacWhinney 2005; Ventureyra, Pallier & Yoo 2004). Inherent in this interpretation is often the assumption that the “less L1”, the less it will interfere with the L2. In this talk, I discuss the theoretical underpinnings of such ''bilingualism accounts'' of L2 ultimate attainment, evaluate the existing evidence for and against such claims, and present data from a recent research project (Abrahamsson, Bylund & Hyltenstam) aimed at exploring differences and similarities between speakers of monolingual and bilingual backgrounds.

This final talk of the inaugural cycle of the CeLM lecture series was preceded by a list of fantastic talks as detailed below (in chronological order of presentation) over the course of the Autumn and Spring term. As always, all are welcome to these talks. Please check our website under events for next year's series, which will be uploaded by the end of summer in August (http://www.reading.ac.uk/celm/).

1) Prof. Roumyana Slabakova
University of Iowa & University of Southampton
The Effect of Construction Frequency and Native Transfer on the L2 knowledge of the Syntax-Discourse Interface

2) Prof. Li Wei
Birkbeck College, University of London
Multilingualism, Social Cognition, and Creativity

3) Prof. Suzanne Romaine
University of Oxford
Multilingual Europe- Language rich, policy poor?

4) Dr. John Williams
University of Cambridge
Linguistic Naturalness and Implicit Learnability

5) Prof. David Green
University College London
Language Control in Bilingual and Multilingual Speakers

6) Prof. Jean Marc Dewaele
Birkbeck College, University of London
Intra- and Inter-individual Variation in Code-Switching Patterns of Adult Multilinguals

7) Dr. Victoria Murphy
University of Oxford
Language and Literacy Development in Children with English as an Additional Language

8) Prof. Guillaume Thierry
Bangor University
Do bilinguals really have two languages?

9) Prof. Martha Young Scholten
Newcastle University
Beginners: research, assessment and materials.

10) Dr. Laura Shapiro
Aston University
Reading comprehension in children from diverse language backgrounds

11) Dr. Selma Babayigit
UWE, Bristol
Oral language and literacy development in children with English as a second language

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; Language Acquisition

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