* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *


LINGUIST List 25.1621

Mon Apr 07 2014

Diss: Arabic, Hebrew, Phonology, Historical Ling, Socioling: Horesh: 'Phonological outcomes of language contact ...'

Editor for this issue: Xiyan Wang <xiyanlinguistlist.org>

Date: 06-Apr-2014
From: Uri Horesh <uri.horeshnorthwestern.edu>
Subject: Phonological outcomes of language contact in the Palestinian Arabic dialect of Jaffa
E-mail this message to a friend

Institution: University of Essex
Program: MPhil/PhD in Linguistics
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2014

Author: Uri Horesh

Dissertation Title: Phonological outcomes of language contact in the Palestinian Arabic dialect of Jaffa

Dissertation URL: http://bit.ly/horeshphd

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
                            Phonology
                            Sociolinguistics

Subject Language(s): Arabic, South Levantine (ajp)
                            Hebrew (heb)

Dissertation Director:
Enam Al-Wer

Dissertation Abstract:

This is a thesis in variationist sociolinguistics. It attempts to make a
contribution to the study of a dialect of Arabic—Palestinian Arabic—spoken
in a region where the population is gradually becoming engulfed in a
language, which was once quite similar to Arabic, namely Hebrew, but has
undergone drastic changes, particularly in its phonological structure, as a
result of contact with European languages.

Now, Modern Hebrew is acting as a colonizing language vis-à-vis Palestinian
Arabic, and in this study we are exploring the effects the contact between
the two languages on the phonology of Arabic in the town of Jaffa, where
Arabic-speaking Palestinians and Hebrew-speaking Israeli Jews reside,
perhaps not in harmony, but nonetheless in the same urban space.

Employing quantitative methods for one linguistic variable and a
sociohistorical analysis for another, we make the case that the two
variables observed in this study are but a fragment of the entire complex.
Examples from the data collected are provided and briefly analyzed, some of
which are from other domains of the language, and these will be further
explored at a later date.



Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue



Page Updated: 07-Apr-2014

Supported in part by the National Science Foundation       About LINGUIST    |   Contact Us       ILIT Logo
While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.