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LINGUIST List 25.1780

Thu Apr 17 2014

Summer Schools: University of Chicago Summer Language Institute / Chicago, Illinois, USA

Editor for this issue: Malgorzata Cavar <gosialinguistlist.org>

Date: 17-Apr-2014
From: James McCormick <summerlanguagesuchicago.edu>
Subject: University of Chicago Summer Language Institute / Chicago, Illinois, USA
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University of Chicago Summer Language Institute

Host Institution: University of Chicago
Website: http://summerlanguages.uchicago.edu

Dates: 23-Jun-2014 - 29-Aug-2014
Location: Chicago, Illinois, USA

Focus: Whether you need to acquire proficiency skills to prepare to study abroad, to gain reading skills in a language for scholarly research, or learn to read ancient texts in the original, the Summer Language Institute has a course for you. Our summer language students enjoy a welcoming setting for experiencing the academic rigor that is the hallmark of the University of Chicago and sharing their passion for knowledge with other likeminded students.

The Summer Language Institute takes place in leafy Hyde Park on the shores of Lake Michigan, just a short train ride from downtown Chicago. Click here for more information on the incredible variety of activities available in Hyde Park and in the rest of Chicago during the summer months.

Minimum Education Level: No Minimum


Description:
The Summer Language Institute offers three categories of language courses:

- Beginning and Intermediate courses in the modern languages are designed for students wishing to develop proficiency across all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The intensive approach of these courses and the concentrated environment of the summer schedule help students to make quick progress. A full sequence (e.g., French 10100-10200-10300) often enables the students to progress at a speed that is the equivalent of a year or more of instruction during the regular academic year.

- Reading and research courses focus on the skills graduate students need to access secondary literature in other languages. Students will become familiar with the advanced grammatical structures and idiomatic characteristics of academic prose. They will also practice reading comprehension on articles drawn from their own fields and can begin integrating those materials into their own research projects. By the end of this course, participants will be able to navigate a wide range of scholarly texts in the target language.

- Faculty from the University of Chicago’s renowned ancient and classical language departments guide students in building and honing their reading and translation abilities. Beginning students can expect a comprehensive introduction to the languages, which will allow them to begin reading original texts. Intermediate students solidify their mastery of grammar and syntax while reading extensively in authentic texts, developing the skills necessary to begin scholarly work with Classical sources.

Course(s) Offered:

Intermediate Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)
This course develops skills and techniques acquired in Introduction to Interpretation. In consecutive interpretation, the following will be emphasized: clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction and presentation, and strategies for dealing with cultural and linguistic problems. Students will expand their active vocabulary to include terms and idioms frequent in speech. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret passages in professional settings.

Beginning Elementary Spanish
This elementary sequence (SPAN 10100-10200-10300) will help students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken Spanish and their use in everyday communication. Attention will be given to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing).

Intensive Intermediate Turkish
Intensive Intermediate Turkish enables students to develop strong intermediate speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and further solidify their foundation in grammar and vocabulary. Students study Turkish as it is used in authentic media, literature, and film, and gain familiarity with Turkish culture and civilization. The course will also address the needs of those preparing to study Ottoman. Intermediate Turkish is FLAS eligible.

Elementary Arabic
The goal of this three-course sequence is the mastery of a core of vocabulary and the control of the basic syntactic and morphological structures of standard Arabic, the language used by all Arabs in writing and speech in formal settings. Activities include listening comprehension, writing short sentences, and reading short selections as well as participating in conversations.

Intermediate Arabic
Prerequisite: At least one year of Arabic. The intermediate Arabic course sequence is focused on encouraging the students to learn the language and culture at the same time. We work with narrative or expository texts that deal with society, history, economics, politics, and culture of the Arab World. We also use literary selections such as short stories, plays, poems, music, movies, etc. in an all-Arabic classroom. Intermediate Arabic is FLAS eligible.

Elementary Modern Chinese
This course sequence introduces the fundamentals of Modern Chinese. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. Class will meet for five three-hour periods a week. This intensive course sequence requires students to spend a minimum of five additional hours per day preparing for class through drill sessions, independent study, and other activities.

Beginning Elementary French
This elementary course sequence (FREN 10100-10200-10300) will help students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken French and their use in everyday communication. Attention will be given to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing).

Reading French for Resarch Purposes
This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of French to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research. Prerequisite: one quarter of French or equivalent, or placement into French 102, or an intermediate level of another Romance or classical language.

Intensive Introductory Georgian
This six-week course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Georgian. Class time will emphasize basic communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking). Students will also become familiar with Georgian history and culture by working with authentic texts, audio and video, multimedia activities, and film screenings. This course is FLAS eligible.

Intensive Introductory Ancient Greek
Greek 10003 and 10006 comprise a thorough introduction to the Classical Greek language in six weeks, using Mastronarde’s Introduction to Attic Greek (2nd ed.). In daily classes, students learn new grammatical concepts and morphology, practice reading and translating increasingly complex Greek texts, and complete exercises in Greek to gain an active command of the language. In Greek 10006 students will also read unadapted Greek from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon.

Intensive Intermediate Ancient Greek
The intermediate Greek sequence combines extensive reading of texts with a comprehensive review of Classical grammar and syntax; it prepares students for advanced courses in Greek and for the use of Greek texts in their research. Texts studied are taken from a variety of representative and important Classical authors, and typically include Plato and Herodotus, Demosthenes or Thucydides. The backbone of the review sessions is Mastronarde’s Introduction to Ancient Greek along with sight reading.

Intensive Introductory German
Introductory German is a 6-week course designed for students wishing to develop intermediate proficiency in reading, writing, listening and speaking for use in everyday communication. Students will work with authentic materials as well as gain familiarity with the different cultures of the German-speaking countries. The course meets Monday through Friday for three hours per day, with additional 90-minute practice sessions twice per week in the afternoon.

Reading German for Research Purposes
This course prepares students to read and do research in German. Students will gain a fundamental knowledge of German grammar and a basic vocabulary while developing reading comprehension skills and working intensively with scholarly texts in their areas of academic speciality. This course is offered twice each summer. Students should only enroll in one section. NOTE: This course may fulfill the graduate language requirement in some departments.

Reading Hebrew for Research Purposes
The course concentrates on the written language and aims at enabling students to use Modern Hebrew for research purposes. The course is designed to produce fluent readers of Hebrew. Major grammatical and syntactical aspects will be covered and students will acquire substantial vocabulary with attention paid to lexical collocations and semantic fields. By the end of the course, students can expect to have a broad set of skills enabling them to read any text in Modern Hebrew.

Introductory Italian
This course sequence provides beginning students with a solid foundation in basic written and spoken Italian and the cultural norms necessary for everyday communication in Italy. It is specifically designed to help you obtain functional competency in speaking, reading, writing and listening in Italian.

Elementary Modern Japanese
This course sequence is designed to introduce basic Japanese grammar, vocabulary and cultural concepts that are essential for Japanese oral communication and reading for research purposes. All four language skills-listening, speaking, reading and writing-are equally emphasized throughout the sessions. Some knowledge of the Japanese writing system, at least hiragana, is strongly recommended.

Intensive Introductory Latin
Latin 10003 and 10006 offer a comprehensive introduction to Classical Latin language in six weeks, using Keller and Russell's Learn to Read Latin. In daily classes, students learn new grammatical concepts and morphology, practice reading and translating increasingly complex Latin texts, and complete exercises in Latin to gain an active command of the language. Students will also read unadapted Latin from classical authors, including Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero.

Intensive Intermediate Latin
The intermediate Latin sequence combines extensive reading of texts with a comprehensive review of Classical grammar and syntax; it prepares students for advanced courses in Latin and for the use of Latin texts in the course of their research. Texts studied are taken from a variety of representative and important authors, which may include Cicero, Seneca, Pliny, and others. The backbone of the review sessions is Keller and Russell, Learn to Read Latin, with supplementary exercises in composition

Intensive Introductory Russian
The RUSS 10003-10006 course sequence provides a comprehensive introduction to modern standard Russian. Students will achieve novice high to intermediate low proficiency in speaking, reading, writing, and listening and will be introduced to Russian culture and history through authentic texts, audio and video, Internet and multimedia activities, and film screenings. The course provides 140 contact hours over a 6-week period, divided into two segments of three weeks each.

Intensive Intermediate Russian
The RUSS 20003-20006 course sequence enables students to develop solid intermediate speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and further solidify their foundation in grammar and vocabulary. Students will explore Russian culture through authentic texts, audio and video, multimedia and Internet activities, and film screenings. The course provides 140 contact hours over a 6-week period, divided into two segments of three weeks each and is FLAS eligible.

Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)
This course introduces students to the field of conference interpretation in general and to consecutive interpretation in particular. It emphasizes the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (Russian/English) and convey it in the target language (English/Russian) in a straightforward and clear manner. The course develops a student’s ability to analyze and paraphrase the meaning of a passage in the source language.


Linguistic Field(s): Language Acquisition


Subject Languages: Arabic, Standard
Chinese, Mandarin
French
Georgian
German
Greek, Ancient
Hebrew
Italian
Japanese
Latin
Russian
Spanish
Turkish

Registration: 03-Feb-2014 to 15-May-2014

Contact Person: James McCormick
Phone: 773 702 5707
Email: summerlanguagesuchicago.edu

Apply on the web: http://summerlanguages.uchicago.edu

Registration Instructions:
Students needing visa processing may have earlier registration deadlines.
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