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LINGUIST List 25.2540

Thu Jun 12 2014

Calls: Socioling, Historical Ling, Cognitive Sci, General Ling/Denmark

Editor for this issue: Anna White <awhitelinguistlist.org>

Date: 11-Jun-2014
From: Aymeric Daval-Markussen <aymemericgmail.com>
Subject: Tenth Creolistics Workshop
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Full Title: Tenth Creolistics Workshop
Short Title: CWX

Date: 08-Apr-2015 - 10-Apr-2015
Location: Aarhus, Denmark
Contact Person: Aymeric Daval-Markussen
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://creolisticsx.dk/

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; General Linguistics; Historical Linguistics; Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Oct-2014

Meeting Description:

The Creolistics Workshop, which has previously been held in London (UK), Amsterdam (NL), Giessen (D) and Aarhus (DK), has a long tradition for being a forum of exchange and inspiration in the creolistics community. For the tenth edition, the main focus will be on innovations, primarily in creoles and sign languages, but also in other types of languages where contact has played an important role.

Creole studies have traditionally focused on continuation and universals, discussing for instance the contributions of the lexifiers and substrates. In past decades, an important body of literature in creolistics has been produced with the goal of weighing the influences from the various contributing languages to creole formation. However, much less attention has been given to innovations, in particular lexical, semantic, syntactic and typological aspects that cannot easily be attributed to the known input languages.

Therefore, the aim of this workshop will be to shift the focus from a historical approach to creoles to a more cognitively-oriented framework whose primary goal will be to explain why certain strategies and structures are innovated and selected in the creation of new language varieties, while others are not.

As sign languages have been argued to show social and structural commonalities with creoles, special attention is given to Deaf Sign Languages.

Call for Papers:

For this workshop, we would like to invite contributions from scholars working on creoles and sign languages from a diachronic or synchronic perspective. We welcome especially papers that deal with outcomes of contact situations where innovative expansions of the grammatical system can be observed, compared to earlier stages or to the contributing languages. We define innovations here broadly so as to encompass any distinction that is found neither in the lexifier, nor in the substrate languages.

Particularly welcome are contributions which touch upon the commonalities between sign languages and creoles, so that possible underlying cognitive mechanisms common to both language types, regardless of the modality they use, can be identified. Other topics of potential interest include, but are not limited to, how innovations spread and diffuse within a community (from ontogeny to phylogeny), or studies that investigate possible links between creole language and sign language genesis.

In the traditional spirit of openness of preceding Creolistics Workshops, other topics in the area of pidgin and creole languages will also be welcome.

The length of abstracts should not exceed 500 words. Please send your anonymized abstract to creolisticsXgmail.com - remember to provide the name(s) of the author(s) and affiliation in the mail itself, not on the abstract. The deadline for submitting your abstract is on October 1, 2014. Notification of acceptance can be expected around November 1, 2014.



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