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LINGUIST List 25.427

Sat Jan 25 2014

Calls: Applied Linguistics/France

Editor for this issue: Anna White <awhitelinguistlist.org>

Date: 25-Jan-2014
From: Linda Terrier <linda.terrieruniv-tlse2.fr>
Subject: Success and Failure in Languages for Specific Purposes
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Full Title: Success and Failure in Languages for Specific Purposes
Short Title: 36th APLIUT

Date: 22-May-2014 - 24-May-2014
Location: Nantes, France
Contact Person: Linda Terrier
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.apliut.com/pages/congres/congresprochains.html

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics

Call Deadline: 15-Mar-2014

Meeting Description:

The aim of this conference will therefore be to examine, as comprehensively as possible, the concepts of success and failure in LSP
by approaching the question from different angles such as those offered by pure research, by examples of classroom practice and by
action-research projects which are commonly a feature of language teaching research.

What does the term “success” mean in the field of LSP (Languages for Specific Purposes)? What do we mean by “failure”? If the
concepts of success and failure seem to be interdependent, are they mutually exclusive? Is failure a necessary step on the route to
success? And in the pursuit of excellence, which has become one of the major stakes in higher education since the Bologna Process
(1999 & 2003) and the Lisbon Strategy (2000), is failure for some necessary for the success of others? Does this last statement imply
the creation of an elite with “good”, “less good” and “bad” institutions, teachers and students (Levy 2000).

At a time when no aspect of higher education seems exempt from assessment (Romainville, Goasdoué & Vantourout 2012), has the
time come to reaffirm that success and failure are relative, even arbitrary concepts? How should we define them? How should we
measure them? How should we take them into account to improve teaching programmes in higher education?

The 36th APLIUT conference will provide the opportunity for teachers and researchers to explore the question of success and failure in
teaching, learning and assessment the field of LSP. Perhaps it is time to question the meaning of these terms in language learning now
that the levels defined by the CEFRL nearly 15 years ago seem to be the unique reference source for “objectively” measuring the
success or the failure of a learner or of a programme. This process implies not only a re-examination of the CEFRL, of language
certifications and of assessment in general - whether it be of students, teachers, researchers or universities themselves.

Call for Papers:

Among the questions under examination are success and failure in higher education (Romainville & Michaut 2012) in relation to language teaching, the
relationship between success & failure in language learning and motivation (Williams 1997, Dörnyei 2012), self-efficacy (Bandura 2003), learning strategies of
successful students (Amadieu 2012), learner autonomy (Rivens 2012) or, marking, correction & assessment (Tardieu 2009).

This conference will allow us to explore the current limits of learning and teaching in LSP and how we can move beyond these limits. This may include the
use of the various resources which characterise many of the learning situations in higher education, such as use of ICT tools, self-access language centres,
CLIL , international exchange programmes, etc., which may all contribute to successful language learning but which may also lead to or include failures.

The aim of this conference will therefore be to examine, as comprehensively as possible, the concepts of success and failure in LSP by approaching the
question from different angles such as those offered by pure research, by examples of classroom practice and by action-research projects which are
commonly a feature of language teaching research.

Authors may submit articles resulting from papers given for publication in the journal Recherche et pratiques pédagogiques en langues de spécialité (Vol.
XXXIV, n° 2, June 2015).

For further information: http://www.apliut.com/pages/congres/congresprochains.html.



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