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LINGUIST List 25.499

Thu Jan 30 2014

Calls: Slavic, Phonology, Phonetics/Ireland

Editor for this issue: Bryn Hauk <brynlinguistlist.org>

Date: 30-Jan-2014
From: Zofia Malisz <zofia.maliszuni-bielefeld.de>
Subject: Prosody of Slavic Languages
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Full Title: Prosody of Slavic Languages
Short Title: ProSlav

Date: 20-May-2014 - 23-May-2014
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Contact Person: Zofia Malisz
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.speechprosody2014.org/

Linguistic Field(s): Phonetics; Phonology

Language Family(ies): Slavic Subgroup

Call Deadline: 01-Mar-2014

Meeting Description:

Prosody of Slavic Languages at Speech Prosody 2014 in Dublin

A considerable number of phonetic and phonological phenomena in Slavic languages interact with prosody. The special session is going to address these issues in one of its leading themes, namely, the interaction of segments and prosody. Further themes of the special session regard the ongoing debates regarding Slavic stress systems and acoustic correlates of stress and prominence.

Invited Speakers:

Štefan Beňuš, Constantine the Philosopher University, Nitra and Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava
Jaye Padgett, University of California Santa Cruz
Tamara Rathcke, University of Kent

Workshop Convenors:

Zofia Malisz (Bielefeld University)
Marzena Żygis (Centre for General Linguistics (ZAS) & Humboldt University, Berlin)

Call for Papers:

Prosody of Slavic Languages
Special Session at Speech Prosody 2014
Dublin, Ireland

Main Themes:

A considerable number of phonetic and phonological phenomena in Slavic languages interact with prosody. Prosodic constituents including syllables, prosodic words and phrases create domains for phonological processes and phonotactic restrictions. Moreover, the edges of these constituents, as well as prominence, influence properties of segments and conversely, prosodic properties are contingent upon segmental properties to some extent. Accumulating evidence gained from laboratory phonological research recently provided new insights into different kinds of phenomena taking place in Slavic languages (cf. e.g. Pouplier and Beňuš, 2011; Iskaraus and Kavitskaya, 2010; Malisz, Żygis and Pompino-Marschall, 2013, Duběda and Keller, 2010). The special session is going to address these issues in one of its leading themes, namely, the interaction of segments and prosody.

Further themes of the special session regard the ongoing debates regarding Slavic stress systems (e.g. Peperkamp et al., 2010; Malisz and Wagner, 2012; Newlin-Łukowicz, 2012; Domahs et al., 2013; for Polish) and acoustic correlates of stress and prominence (Andreeva et al. 2012). Especially analyses that extend beyond pitch, intensity and duration into spectral correlates of stress and prominence in Slavic languages are lacking (c.f. Crosswhite, 2003; Jurgec, 2007). The special session also invites further research on timing phenomena and rhythmic structure in Slavic phonetics and phonology. Especially, the targeted modeling of Slavic rhythmic systems in both individual languages and comparatively, across the family, will be encouraged (Niebuhr, 2012).

Finally, the session is also aimed at providing new insights to intonation and intonational phonology of Slavic languages (Rathcke, 2013), including creating Slavic ToBI systems or alternatives (Andreeva, 2009; Wagner, 2008) as well as acoustic correlates of information structure (Andreeva and Oliver, 2005).

We would also like to invite submissions on rarely reported on Slavic languages or minority languages from the Slavic family, e.g. Sorbian, Cashubian, Ruthenian, Belarusian as well as studies of dialectal prosody.

The special session provides a forum for discussing recent developments regarding prosodic phenomena in Slavic languages.

Please submit your papers via EasyChair at: www.speechprosody2014.org.

Paper format follows the Interspeech format. Guidelines and templates can be found at: www.speechprosody2014.org then go to Call for Papers and scroll down for Author's kit.

Important Dates and Submission Guidelines:

Submission of 4-page papers: open now
Submission deadline: 1 March
Acceptance/rejection notification: 14 March (Note: Early bird registration rates for SP2014 end on 16 March)
Camera ready papers: 31 of March

For full version of the call for papers visit: www.speechprosody2014.org or http://www.zas.gwz-berlin.de/workshop_proslav.html.



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