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LINGUIST List 25.58

Wed Jan 08 2014

Calls: Cognitive Science, Computational Linguistics, General Linguistics/UK

Editor for this issue: Bryn Hauk <brynlinguistlist.org>

Date: 08-Jan-2014
From: Katerina Pastra <kpastracsri.gr>
Subject: AISB-50 Symposium on Embodiment vs. Simulation
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Full Title: AISB-50 Symposium on Embodiment vs. Simulation

Date: 04-Apr-2014 - 04-Apr-2014
Location: London, United Kingdom
Contact Person: Katerina Pastra
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://www.csri.gr/index.php/en/news/128-aisb50-embosim.html

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; Computational Linguistics; General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 27-Jan-2014

Meeting Description:

'Embodied vs. Simulated Behaviour and Cognition: What can Robotics contribute to the Language Sciences?'

This symposium will focus on the embodiment vs. simulation debate, exploring the strengths, limitations, and contributions of these approaches in exploring behaviour, language and cognition. The convention is organised by the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour (AISB).

Call for Papers:

'Embodied vs. Simulated Behaviour and Cognition: What can Robotics contribute to the Language Sciences?'
http://www.csri.gr/index.php/en/news/128-aisb50-embosim.html

Goldsmiths, London, 4 April 2014.

Overview:

Artificial Intelligence, in its early years, adopted an almost purely 'dis-embodied' view of behaviour and cognition. The brain was modeled as a black-box information processing device, fed with symbolic representations of 'percepts' derived from the world, and producing symbolic 'actions' which somehow affect physical systems. However, the shortcomings of this approach have become all too apparent in the last decades. These were manifest not only through difficulties in creating real-world physically-embedded intelligent systems such as robots, but also through experimental results that show the centrality of embodiment to human and animal cognition. Further, it has become clear that embodiment is inseparable from both language use and, more generally, social coordination. In investigation of intelligence, therefore, increasing importance is given to more holistic approaches.

Simulation also has played a crucial role in research on Artificial Intelligence. In order to test theories and study the behavior of systems, one can strive to link physical implementation with real-world experimentation. Often, however, this route is impractical or impossible. This is the case, for example, in studying phenomena such as language evolution that occur across large spatiotemporal ranges. It also applies when the creation and deployment of physical instantiations is costly or difficult as in examining massive amounts of human-robot interaction data. Finally, the same applies in using assumptions that contradict actual physical or social conditions. In these cases, and many more, computational simulation offers an attractive alternative. This, however, brings its own shortcomings: how does one show that the results of simulations have real world validity?

This symposium will focus on the embodiment vs. simulation debate, exploring the strengths, limitations, and contributions of these approaches in exploring behaviour, language and cognition. Highlighting the complexity of coordinated behaviour the symposium will give special weight to language and, specifically, how it is integrated with action and perception.

Topics of Interest:

Topics of interest to this symposium include (but are not limited to):

- Contributions of embodiment approaches to language, cognition and behaviour
- Contributions of simulation approaches to language, cognition and behaviour
- Embodiment vs. simulation: limitations and strengths
- Embodiment and simulation in robotics
- Embodiment and simulation in language sciences

Submission and Publication Details:

Submissions must be short papers (1500-2000 words) and should be sent via email to: embo_simcsri.gr. Style files are available at the symposium website.

Important Dates:

Full paper submission deadline: 27 January 2014
Notification of acceptance/rejection decisions: 13 February 2014
Final versions of accepted papers (Camera ready copy): 24 February 2014
Convention: Friday, 4 April 2014

Symposium Organisers:

Katerina Pastra, Cognitive Systems Research Institute (CSRI)
Stephen Cowley, University of Southern Denmark
Nikolaos Mavridis, New York University, Abu Dhabi



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