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LINGUIST List 25.82

Wed Jan 08 2014

Calls: Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics/Japan

Editor for this issue: Bryn Hauk <brynlinguistlist.org>

Date: 22-Dec-2013
From: Stephanie Ann Houghton <houghtoncc.saga-u.ac.jp>
Subject: 2nd International Symposium on Native-Speakerism
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Full Title: 2nd International Symposium on Native-Speakerism

Date: 29-Sep-2014 - 30-Sep-2014
Location: Saga, Japan
Contact Person: Stephanie Ann Houghton
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics; Sociolinguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Mar-2014

Meeting Description:

'Native-speakerism', a language-based form of prejudice affecting language teachers, is problematic. If it is rejected, on what grounds should the language teachers of the future be employed (i.e., what are the language teachers of the future expected to do, and be, in practice)?

Call for Papers:

'Native-speakerism', a language-based form of prejudice affecting language teachers, is problematic. If it is rejected, on what grounds should the language teachers of the future be employed (i.e., what are the language teachers of the future expected to do, and be, in practice)?

Applicants are invited to submit presentation proposals addressing this question from one or more of the standpoints reflected in Strands 1-3 below.

Strand 1: Individual teacher-researcher narratives related to workplace experience and language-based inclusion/exclusion.

Teacher-researchers are encouraged to share their experiences of language-based inclusion/exclusion in the workplace. Presentations which seek to document the most significant consequences of nativespeakerism and nativespeakerist practices in foreign language education (i.e. impact upon students, teachers , institutions and education in general) are welcome.

Strand 2: Views of Japanese language teachers on Japanese nativespeakerism

Teacher-researchers are encouraged to address how the notion of 'native-speaker' and non-native speaker' of Japanese has been understood in the practices of teaching Japanese as a foreign/second language in Japan. Presentations pertaining to relationships between 'native' and 'non-native speakers' of Japanese, 'native-speaker' identities and the accommodation of 'non-nativespeakers'are welcome.

Strand 3: Replacing the native-speaker as model: Views from the fields of Intercultural Communication, English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) and World Englishes

Taking the 'native-speaker' as model for foreign language learners has been problematised in the fields of intercultural communicative competence, English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) and World Englishes. Teacher-researchers knowledgeable in any of these fields who are seeking solutions to the various problems presented by native-speakerism are welcome to present their ideas.

Abstracts (300 words)should be emailed to houghtoncc.saga-u.ac.jp by March 1, 2014



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