* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *


LINGUIST List 27.1914

Tue Apr 26 2016

Featured Linguist: Christian DiCanio

Editor for this issue: Anna White <awhitelinguistlist.org>

***************** LINGUIST List Support *****************

Fund Drive 2016
25 years of LINGUIST List!
Please support the LL editors and operation with a donation at:
http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/


Date: 26-Apr-2016
From: LINGUIST List <linguistlinguistlist.org>
Subject: Featured Linguist: Christian DiCanio
E-mail this message to a friend

Dear LINGUIST List Readers,

We are pleased to present you our next featured linguist, Christian DiCanio, for Fund Drive 2016.

Please support the LINGUIST List editors and activities with a donation:

http://funddrive.linguistlist.org/

----------------------------------------------

I was brought to linguistics partly by accident, though it has ended up being the perfect match to my strengths and interests. As a child growing up in Buffalo, NY, I was mainly interested in the natural sciences and did not have much of any experience with foreign languages. Yet, when I had the chance to study Spanish in primary school and high school, I discovered that I excelled at it and had a knack for quickly memorizing new words and the idiosyncrasies of grammar. Moreover, in high school, I do recall coming up with a new alphabetic system for English which had different symbols for syllabic consonants (you know, just for fun).

Nevertheless, at that age, it certainly seemed more practical for me to devote my attention to the sciences, which I also loved. So, as an undergraduate, I went away to Brandeis University where I planned to pursue a degree in Chemistry with a minor in Spanish. As a freshman needing guidance in which courses to take, I was assigned a random faculty advisor. That person just so happened to be a linguist named Joan Maling. She nudgingly mentioned to me “Many students who are interested in the sciences and in languages like linguistics.” So, I enrolled in my first linguistics class with Ray Jackendoff. Ray’s enthusiasm for the topic and interest in engaging with students’ ideas proved contagious. Rather simultaneously, Chemistry became rather dull to me. Yet, could one actually study language with scientific rigor and make a career out of it? I didn’t really know if this was true at the time, but I took the plunge and switched majors.

(...)

Read more:

http://blog.linguistlist.org/fund-drive/featured-linguist-christian-di-canio/




Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue



Page Updated: 26-Apr-2016

Supported in part by the National Science Foundation       About LINGUIST    |   Contact Us      
While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.