LINGUIST List 3.198

Mon 02 Mar 1992

Qs: Long Vowels, Flapping, Aphasia

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. Martin Wynne, Laugh and the world laughs with you
  2. Michael Sikillian/Annotext, 3.189 Summary: On-Line Spanish Resources
  3. , Lang. with no final long V
  4. , Query: Flapping
  5. Mary Howe, Recording equipment
  6. , Phonetic font
  7. Dave Eddington, Natural Languages
  8. Ed Battistella, Query

Message 1: Laugh and the world laughs with you

Date: Tue, 25 Feb 92 15:37:22 GMLaugh and the world laughs with you
From: Martin Wynne <LNP5MWcms1.leeds.ac.uk>
Subject: Laugh and the world laughs with you

How to describe the initial verb in the following sentences?

(1) Laugh and the world laughs with you.
(2) Go and I'll never speak to you again.

They look like imperatives, as in:

(3) Go and never come back.

but the second clause in (1) and (2) is declarative. What is
more, the meaning is not that of a normal imperative. Is it a case of
imperative in form, but conditional in content?
Or is it not an imperative at all? Also, is there something odd
about the coordination of two different sentence types in this way?
So perhaps it isn't really coordination (as in "Go and tell him").

Someone tells me that Jesperson calls this ellipsis,
with 'if...then' elided. But where does 'and' come from then?
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: 3.189 Summary: On-Line Spanish Resources

Date: 27 Feb 92 19:20:49 EST
From: Michael Sikillian/Annotext <76264.1323compuserve.com>
Subject: 3.189 Summary: On-Line Spanish Resources

I would like some information about the CLR, specifically, dictionaries
available in electronic form. Thank you.

Michael Sikillian
Annotext
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 3: Lang. with no final long V

Date: Fri, 28 Feb 92 14:29:43 ESLang. with no final long V
From: <sxy646HUXLEY.anu.edu.au>
Subject: Lang. with no final long V

I am looking for languages in which long vowels are found only in non-final
position, like modern colloquial Arabic. Can any body help me?
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 4: Query: Flapping

Date: Sun, 1 Mar 92 17:03:30 ESTQuery: Flapping
From: <Alexis_Manaster_RamerMTS.cc.Wayne.edu>
Subject: Query: Flapping

I would appreciate any references to experimental work on
the problem of flapping in English, bearing on the issue
of whether forms like beating vs. beading are homophonous.
The only work I know of is a paper by Fox and Terbeek from the
1970's.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 5: Recording equipment

Date: Fri, 28 Feb 92 14:02:11 CSRecording equipment
From: Mary Howe <HOWEUKANVM.bitnet>
Subject: Recording equipment

I'd like to know what kind of recording equipment other people use for
recording conversation. I've used a Walkman-type tape recorder with
an external microphone from Radio Shack in the past, but my mike broke
recently. It was really good because it was flat, black, and about the size of
a credit card and therefore quite unobtrusive. Unfortunately, Radio
Shack doesn't make this kind anymore. Although I let people know ahead
of time that I will be recording their conversations, I want the tape
recorder to be as unobtrusive as possible. My local stereo & music
equipment stores have suggested either lapel mikes, which are
DEFINITELY too obvious, or big flat omnidirectional mikes (which I can't
remember the name of). Any ideas?
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 6: Phonetic font

Date: Fri, 28 Feb 1992 11:30:46 Phonetic font
From: <SHLONSKYuni2a.unige.ch>
Subject: Phonetic font

Does anybody know where I can obtain a font of phoentic (ie.g. IPA)
characters than I can use with Wordperfect and print on a HP Laserjet III?
Thanks,
Ur Shlonsky
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 7: Natural Languages

Date: Fri, 28 Feb 92 10:35:51 -0Natural Languages
From: Dave Eddington <eddingccwf.cc.utexas.edu>
Subject: Natural Languages


What exactly is meant by the term 'natural languages?' Is this used to exclude
Esperanto and other synthetic languages? In this case, why is it so important
to say, for example, 'devoicing of word final obstruents is common in natural
languages,' instead of saying 'languages' period?
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 8: Query

Date: Mon, 2 Mar 92 07:33:51 CSTQuery
From: Ed Battistella <battistecis.uab.edu>
Subject: Query

A while ago I recalled seeing an article dealing with the
portrayal of aphasic speech in John Irving's The World
According to Garp vis a vis Jakobson's Child Language, Aphasia,
and Phonological Universals monograph. But unfortunately, I
can't remember where I saw this paper or who the author was.
Does anyone know?

I'm also curious if anyone knows of any video resources on
aphasia suitable for showing to an undergrad class?

If people send reply to me directly, I'll summarize and
post to the group.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue