LINGUIST List 3.25

Mon 13 Jan 1992

Qs: Tagger, ASL, Dutch, Mabang, Eskimo

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. Rohini Srihari, Part-of-Speech Tagger
  2. Robert D Hoberman, ASL
  3. David E Newton, Dutch
  4. , Mabang Linguistics
  5. Rick Broadhead, Eskimo

Message 1: Part-of-Speech Tagger

Date: Thu, 9 Jan 92 10:31:07 ESTPart-of-Speech Tagger
From: Rohini Srihari <rohinics.Buffalo.EDU>
Subject: Part-of-Speech Tagger

I wanted to know where I could obtain a part-of-speech
tagger. In particular, I am looking for the one
described by Church in a 1988 paper. I would appreciate
information on other available POS taggers as well.

Thanks,

Rohini K. Srihari
Center for Document Analysis and Recognition
SUNY at Buffalo
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Message 2: ASL

Date: Thu, 9 Jan 1992 11:03 EST ASL
From: Robert D Hoberman <RHOBERMANccmail.sunysb.edu>
Subject: ASL


 State University of New York at Stony Brook
 Stony Brook, NY 11794-3355

 Robert Hoberman
 Comparative Studies Dept.
 516-632-7462, -7460
 09-Jan-1992 10:53am EST
TO: Remote Addressee ( _linguisttamvm1.tamu.edu)


I would like to have a list of colleges and universities that accept ASL in
satisfaction of college-wide undergraduate foreign language requirements. If
you know of such an institution, would you please let me know? Detailed
explanations are not needed; some faculty members here are asserting that, in
accepting ASL, we are among a tiny (and misguided) minority, and I'd like to
know if that's incorrect. Please send responses directly to me, and I'll
summarize them for the List. Thanks.

Bob
rhobermansbccmail.bitnet
rhobermanccmail.sunysb.edu
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Message 3: Dutch

Date: Fri, 10 Jan 92 15:17 GMT
From: David E Newton <DEN1vaxb.york.ac.uk>
Subject: Dutch

Does anyone have any information (references, etc) on ambisyllabicity in
Dutch?

Reply either to the list or direct to me, whichever seems more appropriate.

Thanks

David E Newton
den1uk.ac.york.vaxa
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Message 4: Mabang Linguistics

Date: Mon, 13 Jan 92 12:06 GMT
From: <FARGHALYauc.eg>
Subject: Mabang Linguistics

I am posting this on behalf of a graduate student of mine. He is doing
linguistic analysis of Mabang his native language, spoken by the Maba of
Eatern Chad and Western Sudan. He would like to know of any work in print
or accesible that has already been done Mabang. Please send replies to
Farghalyauc.eg.
Thank you very much in advance.
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Message 5: Eskimo

Date: Sun, 12 Jan 92 14:13:24 ESEskimo
From: Rick Broadhead <YSAR1111VM1.YorkU.CA>
Subject: Eskimo

Does anyone out there speak any of the Inuit languages, or know someone that
does? I want to identify the language that is heard on an out of service
BELL recording in Baker Lake, Northwest Territories. A qualified translator
claims the message sounds like a portion of a radio broadcast rather than the
standard "We're sorry, the number you have dialed is not in service. Please
check the number or try your call again. This is a recording." I would
like to verify this. Since the number is out of service, there *should*
be no charge on your telephone bill for dialing it.

See the posting below for the number (originally appeared on TELECOM DIGEST).
Please reply either to me (ysar1111VM1.YorkU.CA) or to LINGUIST.

Rick Broadhead ysar1111VM1.YorkU.CA

========================================================================
 From: floydhayes.ims.alaska.edu (Floyd Davidson)
 Subject: Re: NWT Intercept Recordings in Eskimo Language
 Organization: University of Alaska Institute of Marine Science
 Date: Wed, 8 Jan 1992 06:50:42 GMT

In article <telecom12.15.13eecs.nwu.edu> martincod.nosc.mil (Douglas
W. Martin) writes:

> By now my fascination with intercept recordings and with calling
> remote places is well documented. On a whim I called Baker Lake, NWT
> 819-793-1234 and got an intercept recording in some Eskimo language.
> I've kept it for possible future use on my answering machine. Does
> anyone know any even more isolated places with interesting recordings?

That seems to be a very strange recording! Some of us here have our
own translators for such things as Yupik or Inupiat. My cohort at at
work tonight got his translator on line (she is from Tuktoyaktuk in
the Canadian Arctic) and called that line a couple times to listen to
it. His translator says that sounds like "Eastern Arctic", which
would be a variation of Inupiat Eskimo. But she also says it doesn't
have anything to do with the telephone, but sounds like a snip of
something intended to be part of a news broadcast on the radio!

Floyd L. Davidson floydims.alaska.edu Salcha, Alaska
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