LINGUIST List 3.514

Sun 21 Jun 1992

Qs: Glottal Stop; Belgian French; Ghana; Charm

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  1. , Query: glottal stops
  2. , query: Belgian French and Parisian French phonology
  3. , E-mail address: Linguistics Department, Univ. of Ghana, Accra
  4. , Charm and government

Message 1: Query: glottal stops

Date: Fri, 19 Jun 92 15:53 +1000Query: glottal stops
From: <EMWvaxc.cc.monash.edu.au>
Subject: Query: glottal stops

This is a question about phonemic glottal stops. I am aware of a few
instances of consonants developing into glottal stops, e.g. Proto-Eastern
Polynesian (PEP) *k > Hawaiian ? (where ? = glottal stop), PEP *h > Rarotongan
?, PEP *ng, k > Tahitian ?. I also know of a number of glottal stops which
have been lost, i.e. have merged with 0, again primarily from Polynesian
languages. My question is, does anyone know of a glottal stop ever developing
into some other consonant rather than the other way around? I'm not talking
about a glottal stop + another consonant developing into a glottalized
consonant, but more like a glottal stop developing to /k/ or /h/.

Monty Wilkinson, Department of German Studies and Slavic Studies
Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
emwvaxc.cc.monash.edu.au
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Message 2: query: Belgian French and Parisian French phonology

Date: Sat, 20 Jun 1992 23:58 EDTquery: Belgian French and Parisian French phonology
From: <BPEARSONumiami.IR.Miami.EDU>
Subject: query: Belgian French and Parisian French phonology

A colleague is planning a study on cross-linguistic infant
phonology, working with Parisian French, Belgian French and
Belgian Dutch (Flemish?)-learning babies. One focus is the
acquisition of final-lengthening effects. He needs to know how
comparable Belgian French and Parisian French are (and whether
final lengthening has been found in the adult languages in
question).

If anyone has any references or data on these matters, could you
please contact me at this address and I'll both forward to him
and summarize for the List.

Thank you,

Barbara Pearson
bpearsonumiami or bpearsonumiami.ir.miami.edu
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Message 3: E-mail address: Linguistics Department, Univ. of Ghana, Accra

Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1992 10:31:49 E-mail address: Linguistics Department, Univ. of Ghana, Accra
From: <jblackkean.ucs.mun.ca>
Subject: E-mail address: Linguistics Department, Univ. of Ghana, Accra

Having failed to reach the linguistics department, University of
Ghana, Legon, Accra, by phone and fax, I would appreciate receiving
from Linguist subscribers information leading to successful e-mail
contact with any member of that department. Replies please to
<jblackkean.ucs.mun.ca>, or fax at (709) 737-4000, or vox at (709)
737-8134.

J. Black
Linguistics Department
Memorial University of Newfoundland
Canada
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Message 4: Charm and government

Date: Fri, 19 Jun 92 09:32:38 EDCharm and government
From: <maxwelljaars.sil.org>
Subject: Charm and government

I'm reading a book now that refers to the
phonological theory of "charm and government"
presented in:
 Kaye, Jonathan, Jean Lowenstamm, and Jean-Roger
 Vergnaud, 1985. "The internal structure of
 phonological elements: a theory of charm and
 government." Phonology Yearbook 2:305-328.
I've read the latter article, and would be interested
in reading any commentary on it; but I can't find any
later references to it. Has their theory been
discussed elsewhere?

Mike Maxwell Phone: (704) 843-6369
JAARS Internet:maxwelljaars.sil.org
Box 248

Waxhaw, NC 28173
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