LINGUIST List 3.59

Wed 22 Jan 1992

Qs: 2nd Lang. Acq., Topic, 3rd Person Pronouns

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  1. , secong lang. acquisition textbook
  2. , Re: Topic
  3. BROADWELL GEORGE AARON, languages without a third person pronoun

Message 1: secong lang. acquisition textbook

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 92 10:13 CST
From: <FFEvz.acs.umn.edu>
Subject: secong lang. acquisition textbook


I'll be teaching in the near future a course on second language acquisition
to an audience of graduate students whose backgrounds are basically in
education. Any suggestions on what textbook would be suitable for such
a group will be appreciated.

Thanks. Please respond directly to me if possible. (FFEVZ.ACS.UMN.EDU)
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Message 2: Re: Topic

Date: Tue, 21 Jan 92 17:05:08 GMRe: Topic
From: <WHEATLJSibm3090.computer-centre.birmingham.ac.uk>
Subject: Re: Topic

Birmingham's CD ROM database of bibliograahies in not running
so in desperation I turn to the world at large. I am looking for recent
work on topic in linguistics. Not so much sentential topic as discourse
topic - and with special reference to spoken rather than written language. I am
 looking for something systematic and workable with long stretches of
professional negotiation discourse. Thanks in advance for your help.

yours
John Wheatley
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Message 3: languages without a third person pronoun

Date: Wed, 22 Jan 92 13:55:42 -0languages without a third person pronoun
From: BROADWELL GEORGE AARON <gb661csc.albany.edu>
Subject: languages without a third person pronoun


[I thought I posted this once before, but never saw it appear and never
got any responses. Forgive me if this is a duplicate -- GAB]

Choctaw has independent pronouns for 1st and 2nd person, but lacks 3rd
person independent pronouns corresponding to 'she, he,' etc. To
refer to third persons one uses demonstrative pronouns 'this one, that
one'.

I believe there is a similar phenomenon in Latin.

I would appreciate leads on any discussion of this topic (formal/
functional/typological or whatever). Post directly to me, and I'll
summarize for the list.

Thanks
******************************************************************************
Aaron Broadwell, Dept. of Linguistics, University at Albany -- SUNY,
Albany, NY 12222 gb661thor.albany.edu
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